civil death


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civil death

n.
1. The revocation of civil rights by a government, especially as a consequence of a felony conviction or treasonous act.
2. The loss of civil rights as a consequence of banishment, abjuring the realm, or entry into a religious order.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

civil death

n
(Law) law (formerly) the loss of all civil rights because of a serious conviction. See also attainder
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.civil death - the legal status of a person who is alive but who has been deprived of the rights and privileges of a citizen or a member of society; the legal status of one sentenced to life imprisonment
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
legal status - a status defined by law
2.civil death - cancellation of civil rights
cancellation - the act of cancelling; calling off some arrangement
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
morte civil
References in classic literature ?
"He goes for ten years," replied the guard, "which is the same thing as civil death, and all that need be said is that this good fellow is the famous Gines de Pasamonte, otherwise called Ginesillo de Parapilla."
Secondly, there was the account of four years more, while they kept the effects in their hands, before the government claimed the administration, as being the effects of a person not to be found, which they called civil death; and the balance of this, the value of the plantation increasing, amounted to nineteen thousand four hundred and forty-six crusadoes, being about three thousand two hundred and forty moidores.
Well, I've been busy practicing law, but I've also been plotting and planning an approach to the civil death statute, trying to figure out how to bring that issue before the court in such a way to directly attack its constitutionality.
Andrews and James Bonta, Edward LaTessa, Joan Petersilia, Jeremy Travis, Rick Seiter, etc., but just as important as the usual suspects, the references included material on subjects like probation fees, practitioner compliance with risk and needs analysis, the fiscal crisis in corrections, risk and need tools for antisocial behavior among youthful populations, civil death and many others.
(1) In American law before the middle of the twentieth century, this was referred to as civil death. (2)
The petitioners argue that Aadhaar, if fully implemented, would "reduce citizens to servitude," since not having an Aadhaar number (that "electronic leash") in effect meant "civil death."
Linking of biometric UID/Aadhaar number to all public services is designed to cause civil death. Civil death is the loss of all or almost all civil rights by a person, caused by the government of a country.
Punishments of this sort are extremely common historically: outlawry, infamy, exile, excommunication, attainder, and civil death form a chain of exclusionary punishments across the centuries.
On the contrary, a pro-government columnist known for his targeting of opponents, called for the formation of "civil death mechanisms as in the West." According to this mechanism, he argues, even before prosecutors take action, universities should fire such academics and society should isolate them.
In one particularly compelling analysis, Gabriel Chin argues that CCs have effectively resurrected the colonial-era punishment of "civil death," and must be understood as punishment, just as civil death was.
The pre-Revolutionary punishment of "civil death" transformed into legal mechanisms to define counterrevolutionary emigres as fugitives who remained internal enemies.
penal systems developed in parallel with the plantation, for example, she introduces the figure of the black convict, whose activation by the law as a culpable person is not fully accounted for by the procedures of what Colin Dayan and others have described as the civil death enacted in both prison and plantation.