civilianization

ci·vil·ian·ize

 (sĭ-vĭl′yə-nīz′)
tr.v. ci·vil·ian·ized, ci·vil·ian·iz·ing, ci·vil·ian·iz·es
To convert to civilian operation or control.

ci·vil′ian·i·za′tion (-ĭ-zā′shən) n.

civilianization

(sɪˌvɪljənaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

civilianisation

n
the conversion from military to civilian status
References in periodicals archive ?
Our party constitutes a ground where the unity and the integrity of the Republic of Turkey, the secular, democratic, social state of law, and the processes of civilianization, democratization, freedom of belief and equality of opportunity are considered essential.
The City will allocate $170 million to add approximately 1,300 new uniformed officers to the NYPD's roster, along with reforms in overtime and civilianization that, when phased in, will generate over $70 million in savings.
Brian Forst, The Privatization and Civilianization of Policing, in 2 Boundary Changes dm Crim.
Those opposed to this continued civilianization believed that it ultimately would remove the military character of the military justice system--which they believed was essential if the system was to remain a tool of discipline for commanders.
Civilianization of the military emerged in 1973 as a negative force in the wake of several defence and government reviews.
It provided the AKP with a needed pretext for undertaking a series of drastic internal reforms so as to meet EU accession criteria, especially with regard to the civilianization of governmental authority, which meant confronting and curbing the deep state (of Kemalist origins) and limiting the intrusion of the military in public affairs.
The Local will not rest until members are treated fairly and full civilianization of the police department has been realized"
The effects of European integration on Turkish foreign policy did not only bring about structural changes, such as the civilianization of decision-making processes, but also required the internalization and implementation of peaceful means for handling the issues on Turkey's foreign policy agenda.
Charles Wilkins asks a large question: What can the sijills of Aleppo tell us about the "militarization of the civilian population" and/or its mirror "the civilianization of the military population" in an era of bureaucratic reform and mobilization for war at the end of the seventeenth century?
In the meantime, the architect of that alignment on the Turkish side, the military, was fast losing political ground as a result of intensive civilianization of the polity, indictments against its members for alleged coup plots and other illicit activities and further democratization.