claimant


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

claim·ant

 (klā′mənt)
n.
A party that makes a claim, especially one that is legally cognizable.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

claimant

(ˈkleɪmənt)
n
1. a person who makes a claim
2. (Law) a person who brings a civil action in a court of law. Formerly called: plaintiff Compare defendant1
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

claim•ant

(ˈkleɪ mənt)

n.
a person who makes a claim.
[1740–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.claimant - someone who claims a benefit or right or title; "claimants of unemployment compensation"; "he was a claimant to the throne"
applicant, applier - a person who requests or seeks something such as assistance or employment or admission
Pretender - a claimant to the throne or to the office of ruler (usually without just title)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

claimant

noun applicant, pretender, petitioner, supplicant, suppliant the rival claimant to the French throne
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

claimant

noun
1. One who sets forth a claim to a royal title:
2. One that makes a formal complaint, especially in court:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُطالِبٌ بِحَق، مُدَّعٍ
uchazeč
fordringshaver
igénylõ
kröfuhafi, krefjandi
hak talep eden kişi

claimant

[ˈkleɪmənt] N (in court) → demandante mf (Brit) [of benefit] → solicitante mf; (to throne) → pretendiente mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

claimant

[ˈkleɪmənt] n
[benefit] → requérant(e) m/f
(LAW)requérant(e) m/fclaim form n
(for insurance compensation)formulaire m de déclaration de sinistre
(for expenses)note f de frais
(for benefit)formulaire m de demandeclaims adjuster claims adjustor [ˈkleɪmzədʒʌstər] n (US) (= insurance adjuster) → expert m en sinistresclaim to fame n
his claim to fame → sa prétention à la gloire
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

claimant

n (for social security etc) → Antragsteller(in) m(f); (for inheritance etc) → Anspruchsteller(in) m(f) (→ to auf +acc); (Jur) → Kläger(in) m(f); a claimant to a title/throneein Titel-/Thronanwärter m, → eine Titel-/Thronanwärterin
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

claimant

[ˈkleɪmənt] n (to social benefit) → richiedente m/f; (in court) → citante m/f; (to throne) → pretendente m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

claim

(kleim) verb
1. to say that something is a fact. He claims to be the best runner in the class.
2. to demand as a right. You must claim your money back if the goods are damaged.
3. to state that one is the owner of. Does anyone claim this book?
noun
1. a statement (that something is a fact). Her claim that she was the millionaire's daughter was disproved.
2. (a demand for) a payment of compensation etc. a claim for damages against her employer.
3. a demand for something which (one says) one owns or has a right to. a rightful claim to the money.
ˈclaimant noun
a person who makes a claim. a claimant to the throne.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Hearing this, the others honourably abstained, and the claimant ate the Shepherd all himself.
"Then," said the Successful Claimant, "what good has all this litigation done me?"
The currents are too feeble"; second, Gray the CONVERT, who wrote frankly to Bell in 1877, "I do not claim the credit of inventing it"; and third, Gray the CLAIMANT, who endeavored to prove in 1886 that he was the original inventor.
No plan offered itself: the very exhibition of any desire to keep him would have rendered the claimant more peremptory: there was nothing left but to resign him.
Hunt relinquished his steed to the claimant; not being able to retain him by a second purchase.
Twala's death at the hands of Sir Henry had put an end to all further chance of disturbance; for Scragga had been his only legitimate son, so there was no rival claimant to the throne left alive.
The second claimant stooped quickly beneath the lifted hunting-crop.
The law is clear: it doth not require the claimant to prove ye are slaves, it requireth you to prove ye are not."
The ideas of chivalrous honour, which, amidst his wildness and levity, never utterly abandoned De Bracy, prohibited him from doing the knight any injury in his defenceless condition, and equally interdicted his betraying him to Front-de-B uf, who would have had no scruples to put to death, under any circumstances, the rival claimant of the fief of Ivanhoe.
I attended carefully to his wants and amusements, but not, I own, with the same devoted fondness as before, because I could not feel it; besides, I had now another claimant on my time and care - my ailing infant, for whose sake I frequently braved and suffered the reproaches and complaints of his unreasonably exacting father.
Colonel Pyncheon, the claimant, as we gather from whatever traits of him are preserved, was characterized by an iron energy of purpose.
He heard Fanshaw add that his country was full of such quaint fables and idioms; it was the very home of romance; he even pitted this part of Cornwall against Devonshire, as a claimant to the laurels of Elizabethan seamanship.