clarence


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clar·ence

 (klăr′əns)
n.
A four-wheeled closed carriage with seats for four passengers.

[After the Duke of Clarence (1765-1837), later William IV of England.]

clarence

(ˈklærəns)
n
a closed four-wheeled horse-drawn carriage, having a glass front
[C19: named after the Duke of Clarence (1765–1837)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clarence - a closed carriage with four wheels and seats for four passengersclarence - a closed carriage with four wheels and seats for four passengers
carriage, equipage, rig - a vehicle with wheels drawn by one or more horses
References in classic literature ?
It was at a charity bazaar that Isabel and Clarence first met.
At six o'clock, carrying four Teddy-bears, seven photograph frames, five golliwogs, and a billiken, Clarence went home to tell the news to his parents.
Clarence, when not at the University, lived with his father and mother in Belgrave Square.
Having dressed for dinner, Clarence proceeded to the library, where he found his mother in hysterics and his father in a state of collapse on the sofa.
But just then I heard the harsh music of rusty chains and bolts, a light flashed in my eyes, and that butterfly, Clarence, stood before me!
"Ah, Clarence, good boy, only friend I've got, -- for you ARE my friend, aren't you?
But Clarence had slumped to his knees before I had half finished, and he was like to go out of his mind with fright.
If everybody about here was so honestly and sincerely afraid of Merlin's pretended magic as Clarence was, certainly a superior man like me ought to be shrewd enough to contrive some way to take advantage of such a state of things.
If it will help to pave the way to a renewed understanding between us, I am prepared to apologize for striking Clarence. That is conciliatory, I think, Miss Fenwick?'
'But, though expressing regret for my momentary loss of self-control, I cannot recede from the position I have taken up as regards the essential unfitness of Clarence's presence in the home.'
Listen, now that at last you seem to be getting more reasonable; I wish I could make you understand that I don't keep Clarence for sheer love of him.
But not in the same house as Eustace and Clarence.'

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