clarsach

clarsach

(ˈklɑrsəx; ˈklɑːsək)
n
(Instruments) the Celtic harp of Scotland and Ireland
[C15: clareschaw, from Scottish Gaelic clarsach, Irish Gaelic cláirsach harp]
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Nadia French, Evie Waddell, Robbie Subke, Megan Leishman, Gregor Rodger and Mairi Docherty will showcase their talents on clarsach, fiddle, Scots and Gaelic song, accordion and guitar.
"Over the weekend you can hear a harp concert with myself on electric harp and Wales' foremost triple harpist Robin Huw Bowen; you can try the harp for the first time at a Hands on Harps workshop, bring your little children to a Tiny Hands on Harps session, attend an open rehearsal and debut performance of the brand new harp and spoken word story The Fairy Harp, listen to harp ensemble Dynamic Harps and the Clarsach Society Wales Branch perform, become a Harp Detective and create your very own garden and harp-themed Crown.
But they have not forgotten the people they care about and have used their winnings to "look after" family and friends - including providing backing for a children's mental health book Lucy's Blue Day written by their pal Chris Duke and generously supporting The Clarsach Society in Aberdeen.
Priya was competing in the instrumental section and delivered a very musical and rhythmically secure performance of Gloomy December on her clarsach.
Musicians include singer Alison O'Neill, clarsach player Neil Wood and the ladies of the Largs Gaeic Choir.
Similarly, Gillies works to revise literary history through the reclamation of women's voices, such as that of seventeenth-century Gaelic poet Sileas na Ceapaich, whom Gillies translates in 'Harp Music.' In Sileas's sexualised portrayal of the clarsach ('I am overjoyed by your yellow sweet body'), the Gaelic poet's passion for and dedication to art comes down through the centuries, filling in one detail of the lost history of Scottish women artists.
In the programme nine pieces from Colin Campbell's Instrumental Book will be revived and played on a variety of rare and unusual replica instruments - ranging from an early 16th century wire-strung clarsach (a Celtic harp) to a vulture-bone pipe, created after an original found in Germany and dating from 38,000 BC.
171 4.3.3.1-perc(6):clash.cym-tamb-sm susp cym- (1995) jinglingjohnny*-guiro-sm wdbl-sm,lg tpl.bl-v.lg BD- glsp-lg susp.cym-sm basque dr-sm tamb-knife-tamb- mba-sm BD-crot-bell ("tinny church bell")-flex- bodhran-bunch of small keys-2 maracas-SD-sm rainsticks** -TD-sm Chin.susp.cym-light plastic carton-sm ratchet-tam-t-lg wdbl-lg tam-t (scraped with plastic soapdish)-timp-hp (or clarsach if available)-cel-str (vln solo part to be played on folk vln if available) *a bell-tree **cactus with spine removed, filled with dried peas 58.
(3) Doctoral student, piper, and clarsach player Barnaby Brown is researching the bagpipe sources under the supervision of Susan Rankin at the University of Cambridge.
Concerts at the event - running at Merchiston Castle School from April 4-9 - will feature top Scottish talent including Alison Kinnaird and Mary Macmaster And coming from further afield will be Sian James from Wales, Andrew Lawrence-King from Guernsey, special featured guest Edward Witsenburg from Holland and Eva Curth from Germany and Clotilde Trouillaud from Brittany The distinctive sounds on offer will include the Clarsach, and music from the 16th-18th centuries.
The Gateshead Salvation Army Band with soloist (Judith Dinning) and The Northumbrian Pipes, Clarsach Harps, and organist (Allan Roberts) will ensure a good night is had by all.