classical conditioning


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Related to classical conditioning: operant conditioning

classical conditioning

n. Psychology
A learning process by which a subject comes to respond in a specific way to a previously neutral stimulus after the subject repeatedly encounters the neutral stimulus together with another stimulus that already elicits the response.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

classical conditioning

n
(Psychology) psychol the alteration in responding that occurs when two stimuli are regularly paired in close succession: the response originally given to the second stimulus comes to be given to the first. See also conditioned response
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•di•tion•ing

(kənˈdɪʃ ə nɪŋ)

n.
1. a process of changing behavior by rewarding or punishing a subject each time an action is performed.
2. Also called classical conditioning. a process in which a previously neutral stimulus comes to evoke a specific response by being repeatedly paired with another stimulus that evokes the response.
[1915–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.classical conditioning - conditioning that pairs a neutral stimulus with a stimulus that evokes a reflexclassical conditioning - conditioning that pairs a neutral stimulus with a stimulus that evokes a reflex; the stimulus that evokes the reflex is given whether or not the conditioned response occurs until eventually the neutral stimulus comes to evoke the reflex
conditioning - a learning process in which an organism's behavior becomes dependent on the occurrence of a stimulus in its environment
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, acute stress facilitates classical conditioning and increases apical CA1 dendritic spine density in male rats, but impairs classical conditioning and decreases CA1 spine density in female rats (Wood & Shors, 1998; Shors et al., 2001).
Among the topics are eliciting behaviors and classical conditioning, operant conditioning, schedules and theories of reinforcement, observational learning and rule-governed behavior, and comparative cognition.
He first made the worms crawl through a labyrinth, using classical conditioning methods to teach them the fastest way through the maze.
According to a (http://www.newsweek.com/captive-dolphins-look-forward-play-humans-pavlovs-dogs-946315) Newsweek  report, the technique used in the study is called "classical conditioning" where an animal is trained in such a way that it learns to associate one thing - a stimulus - with another like a specific sound for a particular task.
their fear developed as a result of classical conditioning - a psychological process whereby we learn to associate a particular stimulus with a particular response.
For the remaining 25% of needle phobics who don't experience a fainting response, it's likely that their fear developed as a result of classical conditioning - a psychological process whereby we learn to associate a particular stimulus with a particular response.
In a recent systematic review and meta-analysis on open-label placebo studies, it was hypothesized that the mechanism driving such effects is classical conditioning [53].
The eye-blink classical conditioning (EBCC) is one of the most studied paradigms to investigate cerebellar mechanisms underlying associative motor learning in healthy [3, 4] and pathological [5-8] conditions.
It has been difficult, however, to demonstrate classical conditioning of genital responses in women in the laboratory.
The first was called Classical Conditioning or Associative Learning.
Watson borrowed concepts from classical conditioning to explain Freud's discoveries, notably transference and displacement phenomena and in doing so pioneered the scientific appraisal of Freud's ideas in the laboratory (Watson & Morgan, 1917).

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