classicality


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clas·si·cal

 (klăs′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to the ancient Greeks and Romans, especially their art, architecture, and literature.
b. Conforming to the artistic and literary models of ancient Greece and Rome.
c. Versed in the classics: a classical scholar.
2. Music
a. Of or relating to European music during the latter half of the 18th and the early 19th centuries.
b. Of or relating to music in the educated European tradition, such as symphony and opera, as opposed to popular or folk music.
3. Of, relating to, or being a variety of a language that is epitomized by a prestigious body of literature.
4.
a. Standard and traditional: classical methods of navigation.
b. Relating to or being a school of thought or field of study that is established and widely accepted before others: classical economics.
5. Of or relating to physics that can be described without the use of quantum mechanics or relativity.
6. Relating to or consisting of studies in the humanities and general sciences: a classical curriculum.

clas′si·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē), clas′si·cal·ness n.
clas′si·cal·ly adv.
References in classic literature ?
She has a fine face--originally of a character that would be rather called very pretty than handsome, but improved into classicality by the acquired expression of her fashionable state.
"Olive-green is interesting though, because it adds a flavor of classicality and agelessness to 'nature's essence,' due to the added level of 'insight' coming from yellow.
Classicality also implies something more about hidden variables.
The above criterion of classicality would mean that the nonlinear coherent states [|[z.sub.E]>.sub.N] are able to represent fields with classical analog, at least at the same level as the vacuum |0>.
They define a "classicality" that is very specific, three dimensional and Newtonian, and far-from-eigenstates.
Putti, garlands, festoons, panels and vases were used as architectural coverings or for cabinetry, with decorations in stylised floral, with geometric compositions, elaborations inspired by classicality, by Klimt or oriental themes.
ZUREK, Preferred states, predictability, classicality and the environment-induced decoherence, "Progress of Theoretical Physics" 89/2 (1993) 281-302; W.
The 28-year-old jockey was yesterday waiting to be moved to a private hospital in Gloucester for surgery having suffered the injury in an incident when partnering the Michael Mullineaux-trained Classicality in the Sally Parker's Birthday Celebration Novices' Hurdle.
of Southern Queensland, Australia) considers the esoteric tradition of music composition that emerged from Ferruccio Busoni's concept of Junge Klassizitat, or Young Classicality, and how it is illustrated in the operas Doktor Faust by Busoni and The Golem by Larry Sitsky.
2002 MARKS THE CENTENNIAL of the birth of Stefan Wolpe (1902-1972), who came of age as a composer and pianist in Germany during the 192 Os, influenced by the New Classicality of Busoni, the left-wing modernism of the Melos Circle, the Dadas, the artistic practice and ethos of the Bauhaus, the twelve-tone concepts of Hauer and Schoenberg, and the popular music of the Berlin Cabaret.
In one of Walter Savage Landor's Imaginary Conversations, between the great classical scholar Richard Porson and Southey, Porson is made to say about these lines that they "might have been heard with shouts of rapture in the regions [they] describe," that the whole poem "is such as Sophocles might have exulted to own." Hazlitt saw the classicality of the poem in sculptural terms, as breathing the spirit of the finest antique statuary.