classicism


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Related to classicism: neoclassicism, romanticism

clas·si·cism

 (klăs′ĭ-sĭz′əm) also clas·si·cal·ism (-kə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. Aesthetic attitudes and principles manifested in the art, architecture, and literature of ancient Greece and Rome and characterized by emphasis on form, simplicity, proportion, and restraint.
2. Adherence to the aesthetic values embodied in ancient Greek and Roman art, architecture, and literature.
3. Classical scholarship.
4. A Greek or Latin expression or idiom.

classicism

(ˈklæsɪˌsɪzəm) or

classicalism

n
1. (Art Terms) a style based on the study of Greek and Roman models, characterized by emotional restraint and regularity of form, associated esp with the 18th century in Europe; the antithesis of romanticism. Compare neoclassicism
2. knowledge or study of the culture of ancient Greece and Rome
3.
a. a Greek or Latin form or expression
b. an expression in a modern language, such as English, that is modelled on a Greek or Latin form

clas•si•cism

(ˈklæs əˌsɪz əm)

also clas•si•cal•ism

(-ɪ kəˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. the principles or styles characteristic of the literature and art of ancient Greece and Rome.
2. adherence to such principles.
3. the classical style in literature and art, or adherence to its principles.
4. a Greek or Latin idiom or form, esp. one used in some other language.
5. classical scholarship or learning.
[1820–30]
clas`si•cis′tic, adj.

classicism

1. formerly, an imitation of Greek and Roman art.
2. currently, a dedication to the principles of that art: clarity of execution, balance, adherence to recognized standards of form, and conscious craftsmanship. — classicist, n.classicistic, adj.
See also: Art
1. the employment of compositional formulas and decorative techniques based upon the architecture of ancient Greece or Rome, but often including new ideas.
2. the employment of formulas and decorative techniques with an emphasis upon the subordination of utility in order to stress perfection of form.
See also: Architecture
a literary style characterized by formal adherence to traditions of structure, content, and genre. — classicist, n. — classicize, v.
See also: Literary Style
the principles or style of classic art or literature. — classicist, n.
See also: Antiquity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.classicism - a movement in literature and art during the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe that favored rationality and restraint and strict forms; "classicism often derived its models from the ancient Greeks and Romans"
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
Romantic Movement, Romanticism - a movement in literature and art during the late 18th and early 19th centuries that celebrated nature rather than civilization; "Romanticism valued imagination and emotion over rationality"
Translations

classicism

[ˈklæsɪsɪzəm] Nclasicismo m

classicism

[ˈklæsɪsɪzəm] n (ART)classicisme m

classicism

nKlassik f; (= style of classic architecture)Klassizismus m

classicism

[ˈklæˌsɪsɪzm] nclassicismo
References in classic literature ?
If Gringoire had lived in our day, what a fine middle course he would hold between classicism and romanticism!
'Refined English traditions intermingle with idealized motifs of ancient classicism; while delightful elements such as nautical stripes, safari animals, martini glasses, and ice cream cone patterns can be found alongside dreamy, Greek-inspired portraiture and architecture.'
Shaping the Canons of Ancient Greek Historiography: imitation, Classicism, and Literary Criticism
Buen Gusto and Classicism in the Visual Cultures of Latin America, 1780-1910.
Although contemporary discussions of art and literature are less frequently conducted in terms of the opposition of Classicism and Romanticism than they once were, the pervasive use of these terms during the last two centuries has left its mark.
The essays collected here examine different dimensions of neo-classical visual culture in Latin America during the period, exploring how classicism was imposed, promoted, adapted, and contested in various social, political, economic, cultural, and temporal situations.
Since then, the contemporary architecture of Northern Cyprus displays a strong tendency of a Post-Modern, Western classicism (Yucel-Besim, Kiessel and Tozan, 2010).
On the occasion of the major survey "Chaos and Classicism: Art in France, Italy, and Germany, 1918-1936," organized by Kenneth E.
Ereignis Weimar-Jena, as one of its editors Georg Schmidt explains, undermines any clear distinction between German Classicism and Romanticism just as it rejects the circumscribed boundaries separating Weimar's "court of muses" from the progressive university town of Jena.
Marcel Gutwirth belongs to this latter camp, though he does not intend to be dogmatic about the qualities to be associated with classicism. He prefers to think of it not as a monolithic creation but more vaguely as 'un entrecroisement de traits dominants' (p.
In this text on the English architect Inigo Jones, author Giles Worsley provides a needed re-evaluation of the topic of seventeenth-century classicism, which to date has been a little-studied area of European architectural history.