claustration


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claustration

(klɔːˈstreɪʃən)
n
the act of confining to a small space (usually a cloister)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Marriage with Fyne was certainly a change but only to another kind of claustration. You may tell me that the ordinary powers of observation ought to have been enough.
The mandatory claustration of nuns by the 1298 papal bull Periculoso was reaffirmed by the Council of Trent.
The French Revolution, which dissolved and secularized religious establishments, made claustration impossible and hastened the transformation.
Dans sa communication << Se partager les lieux : les affres du couple moderne chez Jean-Philippe Toussaint >>, Lidia Cotea (Universite de Bucarest, Roumanie) a etabli de subtiles connexions entre la claustration dans l'espace de l'intimite et la quete identitaire de certains personnages problematiques, profondement marques par le tourbillon de plus en plus depersonnalisant de la vie moderne.
The early images of her at the villa reinforce this atmosphere of claustration, and the reader's first glimpse of Nedjma herself also conveys this sense of constraint:
It is through this literary persona that she authorises the social and religious judgements necessary to represent the convent as a place of punishment and suffering, and proposes her contrapasso for those responsible for forced claustration and its consequences.
Abigail's claustration is portrayed as a response to violence and disorder.
In the final chapter, "Contesting the Boundaries of Enclosure," Strocchia takes on the ever popular topic of nuns' imagined licentiousness and the challenges of claustration. While this became an issue for religious and secular authorities across Europe, it appears to have had special meaning in cities like Florence where civic intervention in the lives and morality of its citizens had always existed but increased in the fifteenth century.