claustrophilia


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claustrophilia

(ˌklɔːstrəˈfɪlɪə; ˌklɒs-)
n
(Psychology) abnormal pleasure derived from being in a confined space
[C21: from claustro-, from Latin claustrum cloister + -philia ]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

claustrophilia

an abnormal desire to be closed in, to shut all windows and doors. — claustrophile, n.claustrophilic, adj.
See also: -Phile, -Philia, -Phily
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Ross has written of his belief that white queer theory is suffering from what he calls "claustrophilia" which he describes as "a fixation on the closet function as the grounding principle for sexual experience, knowledge, and politics" (2005:162).
CLAUSTROPHILIA: Abnormal pleasure derived from being in a confined space ie, "His claustrophilia was overwhelming - he'd shut himself away in cluttered cupboards and stay in the lift for hours on end."
But this slender, be-pimpled "Beseiged" is only haft-convincing, and even less engaging, as 14-year-old Lorenzo (Jacopo Olmo Antinori) and his young-adult junkie half-sister Olivia (Tea Falco) embrace the "claustrophilia"--as Bertolucci calls it--of a week spent hiding from the cruel world.
He had never accessed so-called "claustrophilia" sites which cater for people who get a thrill out of being confined in small spaces.
She dismissed speculation that Mr Williams died as a result of some kind of "auto-erotic activity", also denying there was any evidence to suggest claustrophilia - the love of enclosed spaces - was of any interest to him.
For a fuller discussion of the fragility of this graphic distinction, see my remarks on the Old French life of Marina, a cross-dressing saint, in Claustrophilia: The Erotics of Enclosure in Medieval Literature (New York: Palgrave, 2007), esp.
It is a period of "somatic precariousness" (1) in which the inherited cosmic openness of the body gives way to a new "claustrophilia" (7), or walling-in of the psychophysical body.
A claustrophilia, which seems in some ways to work at cross-purposes with the celebration of nature, lends a special emotional charge to many of the novel's settings and even to the images of extreme enclosure in Edward's extravagant metaphors for Ethel: "She was to him as a jewel (yet sweeter and lovelier than any gem) shut up in a casket, of which he alone possessed the key--as a pearl, of whose existence an Indian diver is aware, beneath the waves of ocean, deep buried from every other eye" (222).