clear off


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Related to clear off: clear out

clear off

vb
(intr, adverb) informal to go away: often used imperatively
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.clear off - remove from sight
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
Translations
إذْهَب!يَذْهَب، يَبْتَعِد
zmizet
skrubbe af
abhauendie Kurve kratzenverschwinden
häipyä
maknuti se
meglóg
fara; hverfa
立ち去る
꺼져
försvinna
เอาออกไป
ayak altından çekilmekçekip gitmekuzaklaşmak
cút xéo

clear

(kliə) adjective
1. easy to see through; transparent. clear glass.
2. free from mist or cloud. Isn't the sky clear!
3. easy to see, hear or understand. a clear explanation; The details on that photograph are very clear.
4. free from difficulty or obstacles. a clear road ahead.
5. free from guilt etc. a clear conscience.
6. free from doubt etc. Are you quite clear about what I mean?
7. (often with of) without (risk of) being touched, caught etc. Is the ship clear of the rocks? clear of danger.
8. (often with of) free. clear of debt; clear of all infection.
verb
1. to make or become free from obstacles etc. He cleared the table; I cleared my throat; He cleared the path of debris.
2. (often with of) to prove the innocence of; to declare to be innocent. He was cleared of all charges.
3. (of the sky etc) to become bright, free from cloud etc.
4. to get over or past something without touching it. He cleared the jump easily.
ˈclearance noun
1. the act of clearing or removing. The clearance of these trees from the front of the window will give you more light.
2. the empty space between two objects. You can drive the lorry under the bridge – there's a clearance of half a metre.
3. (a certificate) giving permission for something to be done.
ˈclearing noun
a piece of land cleared of wood etc for cultivation. a clearing in the forest.
ˈclearly adverb
ˈclearness noun
ˌclear-ˈcut adjective
having a clear outline; plain and definite. clear-cut features.
ˈclearway noun
a stretch of road on which motorists are forbidden to stop.
clear off
to go away. He cleared off without saying a word.
clear out
1. to get rid of. He cleared the rubbish out of the attic.
2. to make tidy by emptying etc. He has cleared out the attic.
clear up
1. to make clean, tidy etc. Clear up this mess!
2. to become better etc. If the weather clears up, we'll go for a picnic.
in the clear
no longer under suspicion, in danger etc.

clear off

إذْهَب! zmizet skrubbe af verschwinden φεύγω largarse häipyä déguerpir maknuti se squagliarsela 立ち去る 꺼져 smeren ('m) stikke av spadać afastar-se убираться försvinna เอาออกไป ayak altından çekilmek cút xéo 走开
References in classic literature ?
Well, it took my mind off from every- thing else; took it clear off, and centered it in my helmet; and mile after mile, there it stayed, imagining the handkerchief, picturing the handkerchief; and it was bitter and aggravating to have the salt sweat keep trickling down into my eyes, and I couldn't get at it.
But though the water could clear off the blood, it could not remove the black and blue marks which Thwackum had imprinted on both his face and breast, and which, being discerned by Sophia, drew from her a sigh and a look full of inexpressible tenderness.
Sir,' returned the locksmith, 'she herself prevented me--held me, with all her strength, and hung about me until he had got clear off.
With another he tapped Eric on the head; and, with a third broad swing, ere the other could recover himself, he swept him clear off the stage, much as you would brush a fly off the window pane.
I might have got clear off, if I'd split upon her; mightn't I, Fagin?
I set myself close up to a shop-side with my back to the counter, as if to let the crowd pass by, when keeping my eye upon a parcel of lace which the shopkeeper was showing to some ladies that stood by me, the shopkeeper and her maid were so taken up with looking to see who was coming, and what shop they would go to, that I found means to slip a paper of lace into my pocket and come clear off with it; so the lady-milliner paid dear enough for her gaping after the queen.