clemency


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clem·en·cy

 (klĕm′ən-sē)
n. pl. clem·en·cies
1. A disposition to show mercy, especially toward an offender or enemy. See Synonyms at mercy.
2. A merciful, kind, or lenient act.
3. Mildness, especially of weather.

clemency

(ˈklɛmənsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. mercy or leniency
2. mildness, esp of the weather
[C15: from Latin clēmentia, from clēmēns gentle]

clem•en•cy

(ˈklɛm ən si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the disposition to show forbearance, compassion, or forgiveness in judging or punishing; leniency; mercy.
2. an act or deed of mercy or leniency.
3. (of the weather) mildness.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin clēmentia]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clemency - good weather with comfortable temperaturesclemency - good weather with comfortable temperatures
good weather - weather suitable for outdoor activities
balminess, softness - the quality of weather that is deliciously mild and soothing; "the day's heat faded into balminess"; "the climate had the softness of the south of France"
2.clemency - leniency and compassion shown toward offenders by a person or agency charged with administering justiceclemency - leniency and compassion shown toward offenders by a person or agency charged with administering justice; "he threw himself on the mercy of the court"
lenience, leniency - lightening a penalty or excusing from a chore by judges or parents or teachers
re-sentencing, commutation - (law) the reduction in severity of a punishment imposed by law
free pardon, pardon, amnesty - the formal act of liberating someone
quarter - clemency or mercy shown to a defeated opponent; "he surrendered but asked for quarter"
reprieve, respite - the act of reprieving; postponing or remitting punishment

clemency

noun mercy, pity, humanity, compassion, kindness, forgiveness, indulgence, leniency, forbearance, quarter The prisoners' pleas for clemency were turned down.

clemency

noun
Kind, forgiving, or compassionate treatment of or disposition toward others:
Translations
اعْتِدال، رأْفَه
laskavostmírnost
barmhjertighedmildhed
irgalmasság
miskunn

clemency

[ˈklemənsɪ] Nclemencia f

clemency

[ˈklɛmənsi] nclémence f

clemency

nMilde f(towards sb jdm gegenüber); the prisoner was shown clemencydem Gefangenen wurde eine milde Behandlung zuteil

clemency

[ˈklɛmənsɪ] n (frm) → clemenza

clement

(ˈklemənt) adjective
1. (of weather etc) mild.
2. merciful.
ˈclemency noun
References in classic literature ?
Nevertheless he ought to take care not to misuse this clemency.
Both the good women kept strict silence during the whole scene between Mr Allworthy and the girl; but as soon as it was ended, and that gentleman was out of hearing, Mrs Deborah could not help exclaiming against the clemency of her master, and especially against his suffering her to conceal the father of the child, which she swore she would have out of her before the sun set.
I loved the dim superstition, the propitiatory intent, that had put the grave there; and still more I loved the spirit that could not carry out the sentence-- the error from the surveyed lines, the clemency of the soft earth roads along which the home-coming wagons rattled after sunset.
Had the nobles, by a conduct of clemency and justice, preserved the fidelity and devotion of their retainers and followers, the contests between them and the prince must almost always have ended in their favor, and in the abridgment or subversion of the royal authority.
But my clemency is always ready to descend upon the vanquished.
Clemency is a fine, royal virtue, which turns aside the currents of wrath.
Smith, who, by stating his marriage with a woman of character, as the source of her clemency, gave him reason for believing that had he behaved with honour towards Marianne, he might at once have been happy and rich.
An old book that," said the curate, "but I find no reason for clemency in it; send it after the others without appeal;" which was done.
Do not you recollect, I came about six weeks ago to plead for clemency, as I come to-day to plead for justice.
On approaching the savages, however, the latter showed evident symptoms of alarm, spreading out their arms horizontally, according to their mode of supplicating clemency.
van der Luyden's attitude said neither yes nor no, but always appeared to incline to clemency till her thin lips, wavering into the shadow of a smile, made the almost invariable reply: "I shall first have to talk this over with my husband.
Oh, Frankenstein, be not equitable to every other and trample upon me alone, to whom thy justice, and even thy clemency and affection, is most due.