cliff swallow


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cliff swallow

n.
A swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) of North and South America that builds a bottle-shaped nest of mud and twigs on cliffs or under eaves.

cliff swallow

n
(Animals) an American swallow, Petrochelidon pyrrhonota, that has a square-tipped tail and builds nests of mud on cliffs, walls, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cliff swallow - North American swallow that lives in colonies and builds bottle-shaped mud nests on cliffs and wallscliff swallow - North American swallow that lives in colonies and builds bottle-shaped mud nests on cliffs and walls
swallow - small long-winged songbird noted for swift graceful flight and the regularity of its migrations
genus Hirundo, Hirundo - type genus of the Hirundinidae
References in periodicals archive ?
One butte, within 100 m of the river, is ~8 km distant but is occupied by a Cliff Swallow colony.
BCRV is found at Cliff Swallow colony sites south of our study area, for example in west central Oklahoma, about 750 km from the Nebraska study area (Hopla et al.
Sikes and Arnold (1986) monitored cliff swallows (Hirundo pyrrhonota) in east-central Texas and found nest success was 41% with RIFAs present, compared with 75% success when RIFAs were controlled in nesting areas the following year.
Cooper said despite what bird watchers perceive as a decline, the cliff swallow is adapting to the spread of development.
Oeciacus vicarius is a haematophagous ectoparasite that specializes on the cliff swallow as its host.
A managed Cliff Swallow colony in southern Wisconsin.
Buchanan (1958) attributed the use of cliff swallow nests by M.
Colony-level vigilance (as reflected in distances at which incoming predators are detected) increases in larger Cliff Swallow colonies (Wilkinson and English-Loeb 1982, Brown and Brown 1987), and enhanced predator avoidance may be one reason these birds form colonies (Brown and Brown 1996).
Buggy Creek virus (BCRV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus) is an arbovirus associated with colonially nesting cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and transmitted by its vector, the hematophagous swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius), an ectoparasite of the cliff swallow.
The cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) is identified easily, even in flight, by its square tail, orange rump, chestnut-colored throat, and pale forehead patch (Brown and Brown, 1995).
The birds most commonly involved in airplane collisions in Oregon were the American kestrel and the cliff swallow.
After each landing, ~10-30 Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica) and 0-5 Cliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) captured aerial insects above the Bobolink flock, foraging 1-5 m above the soybean canopy for 5-10 sec.