clinical ecology


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

clinical ecology

clinical ecology

The treatment of disorders believed to result from a person’s reaction to their environment.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Pauling proposed the term orthomolecular, (1), (2) which we recognized as the correct word to define the total interest in nutrition, clinical ecology, and the use of vitamin and mineral supplements.
In the 1950s, under the banner of his "clinical ecology" movement, Chicago allergist Theron Randolph proposed what has come to be known as "multiple chemical sensitivity" or MCS (AAAAI Board of Directors, 1999; Whited, 2004).
To confuse matters even more, the term "environmental medicine" has been adopted by practitioners of a branch of alternative medicine also known as "clinical ecology." To date, this practice has not been evidence-based and cannot be considered a validated approach to such patients.
Clinical ecology is the field pioneered over 50 years ago by Dr.
Waickman, F.J., M.D., et al., "Nutrition As It Relates To Environmental Medicine -- Conference July 25-26, 1990," American Academy Of Environmental Medicine, Denver, CO: Clinical Ecology Publications, Inc., 1990.
Despite their efforts, however, traditional practitioners of allergy, immunology and toxicology reject the theories and methods of clinical ecology.(5)
American Academy of Allergy and Immunology, 1986: "Review of the clinical ecology literature provides inadequate support for the beliefs and practices of clinical ecology....Diagnoses and treatments involve procedures of no proven efficacy."
According to Terr, "Clinical ecology is based on a belief that environmental pollution by synthetic chemicals causes an illness that is not defined by symptoms, signs, physical findings, pathological conditions and laboratory abnormalities...
Council Report, Clinical Ecology. The Journal of the American Medical Association 268(24), 3465-3467.
Clinical ecology is a controversial offshoot of allergy-immunology that, among other things, blames many illnesses on low-level chemical exposures.
If we may envision a "clinical ecology" then we may hope to specify objective criteria for "ecosystem health." With these in hand we may objectively evaluate humanly imposed or induced changes in nature.
Aches and pains and unexplained symptoms are fertile ground for speculation, and in recent years a branch of alternative medicine known as clinical ecology has grown in popularity, which is hardly surprising, given the level of public concern over environmental pollutants.

Full browser ?