clique

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clique

exclusive group of friends or associates: The members formed a clique.
Not to be confused with:
click – a brief, sharp sound: The click of her heels was heard on the stairs.; to press a computer button: click on “open”
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

clique

 (klĭk, klēk)
n.
A small exclusive group of friends or associates.
intr.v. cliqued, cliqu·ing, cliques Informal
To form, associate in, or act as a clique.

[French, from Old French, latch or from obsolete French cliquer, to click, clink, of imitative origin.]

cliqu′ey, cliqu′y, cliqu′ish adj.
cliqu′ish·ly adv.
cliqu′ish·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

clique

(kliːk; klɪk)
n
a small exclusive group of friends or associates
[C18: from French, perhaps from Old French: latch, from cliquer to click; suggestive of the necessity to exclude nonmembers]
ˈcliquish adj
ˈcliquishly adv
ˈcliquishness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

clique

(klik, klɪk)

n., v. cliqued, cli•quing. n.
1. a small, exclusive group of people; coterie; set.
v.i.
2. to form or associate in a clique.
[1705–15; < French, appar. metaphorical use of Middle French clique latch, or n. derivative of cliquer to make noise]
cli′quey, cli′quy, adj.
cli′quish, adj.
cli′quish•ly, adv.
cli′quish•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Clique

 a narrow circle of friends; an exclusive set, 1711. See also coterie, faction.
Example: clique of admirers.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clique - an exclusive circle of people with a common purposeclique - an exclusive circle of people with a common purpose
band, circle, lot, set - an unofficial association of people or groups; "the smart set goes there"; "they were an angry lot"
Bloomsbury Group - an inner circle of writers and artists and philosophers who lived in or around Bloomsbury early in the 20th century and were noted for their unconventional lifestyles
bohemia - a group of artists and writers with real or pretended artistic or intellectual aspirations and usually an unconventional life style
brain trust, kitchen cabinet - an inner circle of unofficial advisors to the head of a government
loop - an inner circle of advisors (especially under President Reagan); "he's no longer in the loop"
cabal, camarilla, faction, junto - a clique (often secret) that seeks power usually through intrigue
junta, military junta - a group of military officers who rule a country after seizing power
maffia, mafia - any tightly knit group of trusted associates
faction, sect - a dissenting clique
galere, rogue's gallery - a coterie of undesirable people
hard core - the most dedicated and intensely loyal nucleus of a group or movement
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

clique

noun group, set, crowd, pack, circle, crew (informal), gang, faction, mob, clan, posse (informal), coterie, schism, cabal The country is run by a small clique of wealthy families.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

clique

noun
A particular social group:
Informal: bunch, gang.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
زُمره، عُصبه
parta
klike
klíka
klikauždaras
kliķe
klika

clique

[kliːk] Ncamarilla f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

clique

[ˈkliːk] ncoterie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

clique

nClique f, → Klüngel m (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

clique

[kliːk] ncricca
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

clique

(kliːk) noun
a group of people who are friendly with each other but exclude others. the golf-club clique.
ˈcliqu(e)y, ˈcliquish adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Two principal groups, distinctly separated from each other, showed the presence of two sets or cliques, two minds even here, in this studio, where one might suppose that rank and fortune would be forgotten.
They could enjoy life with their cliques as well--passengers invariably divide up into cliques, on all ships.
"All persons in society, all cliques in society - or, rather, nearly all persons and cliques - ape their betters.
The nephew of one of the standard Victorian novelists, Mainhall bobbed about among the various literary cliques of London and its outlying suburbs, careful to lose touch with none of them.
This, combined with her beauty and charm -- a charm acknowledged by all who met her -- promptly opened the gates of all cliques, clubs and classes in Redmond to her; and where she went Anne and Priscilla went, too.
There are cliques in America as elsewhere, Lady Hunstanton.
Don't the very greatest ladies of all talk about that small clique of persons to whom they belong?
A clique of sleek men in the city got between her and him to just about that amount.
'Why,' returned Gowan, 'I belong to a clan, or a clique, or a family, or a connection, or whatever you like to call it, that might have provided for me in any one of fifty ways, and that took it into its head not to do it at all.
During all the early part of his public career Burke steadily fought against the attempts of the King and his Tory clique to entrench themselves within the citadel of irresponsible government.
The infection spread; soon there was a party or clique in Grimworth on the side of "buying at Freely's"; and many husbands, kept for some time in the dark on this point, innocently swallowed at two mouthfuls a tart on which they were paying a profit of a hundred per cent., and as innocently encouraged a fatal disingenuousness in the partners of their bosoms by praising the pastry.
Money is not essential, but this wide affinity is, which transcends the habits of clique and caste and makes itself felt by men of all classes.