clocks


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

clock 1

 (klŏk)
n.
1. An instrument other than a watch for measuring or indicating time, especially a mechanical or electronic device having a numbered dial and moving hands or a digital display.
2. A time clock.
3. A source of regularly occurring pulses used to measure the passage of time, as in a computer.
4. Any of various devices that indicate measurement, such as a speedometer or a taximeter.
5. A biological clock.
6. The downy flower head of a dandelion that has gone to seed.
v. clocked, clock·ing, clocks
v.tr.
1. To time, as with a stopwatch: clock a runner.
2. To register or record with a mechanical device: clocked the winds at 60 miles per hour.
3. Informal To strike or hit (someone) forcefully, especially in the face.
v.intr.
1. To record working hours with a time clock: clocks in at 8:00 and out at 4:00.
2. To be measured or registered, especially at a certain speed or rate. Often used with in: a fastball that clocks in at 95 miles per hour.
Phrasal Verb:
clock up Chiefly British Slang
To accumulate; rack up: clocked up a number of wins.
Idioms:
around/round the clock
Throughout the entire 24 hours of the day; continuously.
clean (someone's) clock Slang
To beat or defeat decisively: "Immense linemen declared their intentions to clean the clocks of opposing players" (Russell Baker).
kill/run down/run out the clock
Sports To preserve a lead by maintaining possession of the ball or puck until playing time expires.

[Middle English clokke, from Old North French cloque, bell, or from Middle Dutch clocke, bell, clock, both from Medieval Latin clocca, of imitative origin.]

clock′er n.

clock 2

 (klŏk)
n.
An embroidered or woven decoration on the side of a stocking or sock.

[Perhaps from clock, bell (obsolete), from its original bell-shaped appearance.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clocks - European weed naturalized in southwestern United States and Mexico having reddish decumbent stems with small fernlike leaves and small deep reddish-lavender flowers followed by slender fruits that stick straight upclocks - European weed naturalized in southwestern United States and Mexico having reddish decumbent stems with small fernlike leaves and small deep reddish-lavender flowers followed by slender fruits that stick straight up; often grown for forage
heron's bill, storksbill - any of various plants of the genus Erodium
Translations
References in classic literature ?
"Clocks," said the Prince, "are shackles on the feet of mankind.
"That we will stick by our clocks and our cabbages."
The fact was, Hetty had really forgotten the difference of the clocks when she told Captain Donnithorne that she set out at eight, and this, with her lingering pace, had made her nearly half an hour later than usual.
And others are there who are like eight-day clocks when wound up; they tick, and want people to call ticking--virtue.
It was in this apartment, also, that there stood against the western wall, a gigantic clock of ebony.
Dorothy had already taken the clock key from the peg.
After twice being delayed on the road, we arrived in London at three o'clock on the afternoon of the last day of the month.
But my whole clock's run down; my heart the all-controlling weight, I have no key to lift again.
Some years ago the clock in the tower of the mosque got out of order.
The first sound that told of life and movement revealed the mechanical movement of the clock. Speaking from the lower regions, the tongue of Father Time told the hour before midnight.
If he withdrew them for a moment, it was only to glance at a clock in some neighbouring shop, and then to strain his sight once more in the old quarter with increased earnestness and attention.
June 20th.--Eight o'clock. The sun is shining in a clear sky.