cloister

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clois·ter

 (kloi′stər)
n.
1.
a. A quadrangle enclosed by an open colonnade and a covered walk.
b. The covered walk enclosing such a quadrangle.
2.
a. A place, especially a monastery or convent, devoted to religious seclusion.
b. Life in a monastery or convent.
3. A secluded, quiet place.
tr.v. clois·tered, clois·ter·ing, clois·ters
1. To shut away from the world in or as if in a cloister; seclude.
2. To furnish (a building) with a cloister.

[Middle English cloistre, from Old French, alteration (influenced by cloison, partition) of clostre, from Latin claustrum, enclosed place, from claudere, to close.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cloister

(ˈklɔɪstə)
n
1. (Architecture) a covered walk, usually around a quadrangle in a religious institution, having an open arcade or colonnade on the inside and a wall on the outside
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (sometimes plural) a place of religious seclusion, such as a monastery
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) life in a monastery or convent
vb
(tr) to confine or seclude in or as if in a monastery
[C13: from Old French cloistre, from Medieval Latin claustrum monastic cell, from Latin: bolt, barrier, from claudere to close; influenced in form by Old French cloison partition]
ˈcloister-ˌlike adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

clois•ter

(ˈklɔɪ stər)

n.
1. a covered walk, esp. in a religious institution, having an open arcade or colonnade usu. opening onto a courtyard.
2. a courtyard, esp. in a religious institution, bordered with such walks.
3. a place of religious seclusion, as a monastery or convent.
4. any quiet, secluded place.
5. life in a monastery or convent.
v.t.
6. to confine in a monastery or convent.
7. to confine in retirement; seclude.
8. to furnish with a cloister or covered walk.
9. to convert into a monastery or convent.
[1250–1300; Middle English cloistre < Anglo-French, Old French, b. cloison partition (see cloisonné) and clostre < Latin claustrum barrier]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cloister


Past participle: cloistered
Gerund: cloistering

Imperative
cloister
cloister
Present
I cloister
you cloister
he/she/it cloisters
we cloister
you cloister
they cloister
Preterite
I cloistered
you cloistered
he/she/it cloistered
we cloistered
you cloistered
they cloistered
Present Continuous
I am cloistering
you are cloistering
he/she/it is cloistering
we are cloistering
you are cloistering
they are cloistering
Present Perfect
I have cloistered
you have cloistered
he/she/it has cloistered
we have cloistered
you have cloistered
they have cloistered
Past Continuous
I was cloistering
you were cloistering
he/she/it was cloistering
we were cloistering
you were cloistering
they were cloistering
Past Perfect
I had cloistered
you had cloistered
he/she/it had cloistered
we had cloistered
you had cloistered
they had cloistered
Future
I will cloister
you will cloister
he/she/it will cloister
we will cloister
you will cloister
they will cloister
Future Perfect
I will have cloistered
you will have cloistered
he/she/it will have cloistered
we will have cloistered
you will have cloistered
they will have cloistered
Future Continuous
I will be cloistering
you will be cloistering
he/she/it will be cloistering
we will be cloistering
you will be cloistering
they will be cloistering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cloistering
you have been cloistering
he/she/it has been cloistering
we have been cloistering
you have been cloistering
they have been cloistering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cloistering
you will have been cloistering
he/she/it will have been cloistering
we will have been cloistering
you will have been cloistering
they will have been cloistering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cloistering
you had been cloistering
he/she/it had been cloistering
we had been cloistering
you had been cloistering
they had been cloistering
Conditional
I would cloister
you would cloister
he/she/it would cloister
we would cloister
you would cloister
they would cloister
Past Conditional
I would have cloistered
you would have cloistered
he/she/it would have cloistered
we would have cloistered
you would have cloistered
they would have cloistered
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cloister - residence that is a place of religious seclusion (such as a monastery)cloister - residence that is a place of religious seclusion (such as a monastery)
convent - a religious residence especially for nuns
monastery - the residence of a religious community
priory - religious residence in a monastery governed by a prior or a convent governed by a prioress
residence - the official house or establishment of an important person (as a sovereign or president); "he refused to live in the governor's residence"
2.cloister - a courtyard with covered walks (as in religious institutions)
courtyard, court - an area wholly or partly surrounded by walls or buildings; "the house was built around an inner court"
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
Verb1.cloister - surround with a cloister, as of a garden
border, environ, surround, skirt, ring - extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle; "The forest surrounds my property"
2.cloister - surround with a cloister; "cloister the garden"
border, environ, surround, skirt, ring - extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle; "The forest surrounds my property"
3.cloister - seclude from the world in or as if in a cloister; "She cloistered herself in the office"
isolate, insulate - place or set apart; "They isolated the political prisoners from the other inmates"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cloister

verb
To put into solitude:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
رِواقٌ في دَيْر
ambitklášter
buegangklostergang
manastirsamostan
kerengõkerengőkolostorzárda
bogagöng
dengta galerija
krusta eja
ambit
manastirманастир
клуатр

cloister

[ˈklɔɪstəʳ] Nclaustro m cloisterssoportales mpl
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cloister

[ˈklɔɪstər] ncloître m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cloister

n
(= covered walk)Kreuzgang m
(= monastery)Kloster nt
vr to cloister oneself (away)sich von der Welt abkapseln
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cloister

[ˈklɔɪstəʳ] nchiostro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cloister

(ˈkloistə) noun
a covered walk forming part of a monastery, church or college.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The theme of religion and gender is addressed first by Ulrike Strasser in "Cloistering women's past" (221), a fascinating double analysis of a contemporary account written by a nun who experienced enclosure, and the subsequent historical interpretation of the cloistering of nuns in general: a study in selective social and political memory and its consequences.
Researchers reasoned that such corridors, often called greenways, would allow wildlife and human populations to live intertwined without cloistering wild creatures into islands where they would eventually run out of resources and become dangerously inbred.
(23) While some nuns hesitated to accept cloistering because they simply did not wish to sever their connections to the outside world, others may have been against it purely for practical reasons.