cloot


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cloot

(kluːt)
n
(Animals) Scot and Northern English a hoof

cloot

(klut)

n. Chiefly Scot.
1. a cloven hoof.
2. Cloots, the devil.
[1715–25; perhaps akin to Dutch klauwtje=klauw claw + -tje diminutive suffix]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In doing so, it's said that you leave behind - in the cloot - an ailment or illness at the well.
and can also recite Baxter's famous singalong cloot song: "Gie's a punna burra furra murra.
Words like dede, coo, cloot, hoos, wrang, strang and lang - meaning dead, cow, clout, house, wrong, strong and long - are all exactly the same for Geordies as they were for Anglo-Saxons 1,500 years ago.
Those that live by the old adage "N'er cast a cloot till May's oot" were pleased they did yesterday.
I WAS always told the old saying "Ne'er cast a cloot till May is oot" was in reference to the may flower, not the month of May.
It's what known as a serious dose of reality or, depending on what part of the country you're from, a skelp on the coupon with a dirty cloot.
Or as my own used to say - "never cast a cloot until May is oot".
Sensible people will still refuse to cast a cloot till May is oot - and prepare for winter in the Glasgow Fair Fortnight, as usual.
Can anyone help with the proper meaning of "Ne'er cast a cloot till May is oot"?
Once again that time of year is upon us, when we hear the oft quoted expression: "Never cast a cloot till May be oot.
For Dvorak, the longest such words going forwards have six letters, and there are 33 of them: CLOOTS, CLOUDS, CLOUTS, COOEED, COOEES, CREEDS, CROONS, CROUTS, FLEETS, FLOODS, FLOUTS, FLUIDS, FOEHNS, FRAUDS, FREETS, FREITS, FRITTS, FRUITS, GLEEDS, GLEETS, GLOUTS, GRAINS, GREEDS, GREENS, GREETS, GROINS, GROUTS, PLAIDS, PLAINS, PLAITS, PREENS, PYLONS, and PYRANS.