closure

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closure

the act of closing; bringing to an end; something that closes: The arrest brought closure to the difficult case.
Not to be confused with:
closer – a person or thing that closes: She was called in to be the closer of the deal.; nearer: She’s closer to understanding the situation.
cloture – a method of closing a debate and forcing an immediate vote
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

clo·sure

 (klō′zhər)
n.
1. The act of closing or the state of being closed: closure of an incision.
2. Something that closes or shuts.
3.
a. A bringing to an end; a conclusion: finally brought the project to closure.
b. A feeling of finality or resolution, especially after a traumatic experience: sought closure in returning to the scene of the accident.
4. See cloture.
5. The property of being mathematically closed.
tr.v. clo·sured, clo·sur·ing, clo·sures
To cloture (a debate).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin clausūra, fortress, lock, from clausus, enclosed; see close. Sense 4, translation of French clôture.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

closure

(ˈkləʊʒə)
n
1. the act of closing or the state of being closed
2. an end or conclusion
3. something that closes or shuts, such as a cap or seal for a container
4. (Parliamentary Procedure) (in a deliberative body) a procedure by which debate may be halted and an immediate vote taken. See also cloture, guillotine, gag rule
5. chiefly
a. the resolution of a significant event or relationship in a person's life
b. a sense of contentment experienced after such a resolution
6. (Geological Science) geology the vertical distance between the crest of an anticline and the lowest contour that surrounds it
7. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics the obstruction of the breath stream at some point along the vocal tract, such as the complete occlusion preliminary to the articulation of a stop
8. (Logic) logic
a. the closed sentence formed from a given open sentence by prefixing universal or existential quantifiers to bind all its free variables
b. the process of forming such a closed sentence
9. (Mathematics) maths
a. the smallest closed set containing a given set
b. the operation of forming such a set
10. (Psychology) psychol the tendency, first noted by Gestalt psychologists, to see an incomplete figure like a circle with a gap in it as more complete than it is
vb
(Parliamentary Procedure) (tr) (in a deliberative body) to end (debate) by closure
[C14: from Old French, from Late Latin clausūra bar, from Latin claudere to close]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

clo•sure

(ˈkloʊ ʒər)

n., v. -sured, -sur•ing. n.
1. the act of closing; the state of being closed.
2. a bringing to an end; conclusion.
3. something that closes or shuts.
4. a blockage of the flow of air by contact between vocal organs in producing a sound.
5. a cloture.
6. the property of being closed with respect to a particular mathematical operation.
7.
a. the tendency to see an entire figure even though the picture of it is incomplete, based primarily on the viewer's past experience.
b. a sense of certainty or completeness: a need for closure.
8. Obs. something that encloses; enclosure.
v.t.
9. to cloture.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French < Latin clausūra. See close, -ure]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

closure

In transportation, the process of a unit arriving at a specified location. It begins when the first element arrives at a designated location, e.g., port of entry and/or port of departure, intermediate stops, or final destination, and ends when the last element does likewise. For the purposes of studies and command post exercises, a unit is considered essentially closed after 95 percent of its movement requirements for personnel and equipment are completed.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

closure


Past participle: closured
Gerund: closuring

Imperative
closure
closure
Present
I closure
you closure
he/she/it closures
we closure
you closure
they closure
Preterite
I closured
you closured
he/she/it closured
we closured
you closured
they closured
Present Continuous
I am closuring
you are closuring
he/she/it is closuring
we are closuring
you are closuring
they are closuring
Present Perfect
I have closured
you have closured
he/she/it has closured
we have closured
you have closured
they have closured
Past Continuous
I was closuring
you were closuring
he/she/it was closuring
we were closuring
you were closuring
they were closuring
Past Perfect
I had closured
you had closured
he/she/it had closured
we had closured
you had closured
they had closured
Future
I will closure
you will closure
he/she/it will closure
we will closure
you will closure
they will closure
Future Perfect
I will have closured
you will have closured
he/she/it will have closured
we will have closured
you will have closured
they will have closured
Future Continuous
I will be closuring
you will be closuring
he/she/it will be closuring
we will be closuring
you will be closuring
they will be closuring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been closuring
you have been closuring
he/she/it has been closuring
we have been closuring
you have been closuring
they have been closuring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been closuring
you will have been closuring
he/she/it will have been closuring
we will have been closuring
you will have been closuring
they will have been closuring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been closuring
you had been closuring
he/she/it had been closuring
we had been closuring
you had been closuring
they had been closuring
Conditional
I would closure
you would closure
he/she/it would closure
we would closure
you would closure
they would closure
Past Conditional
I would have closured
you would have closured
he/she/it would have closured
we would have closured
you would have closured
they would have closured
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

closure

The closing of a surgical incision immediately after surgery.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.closure - approaching a particular destination; a coming closer; a narrowing of a gap; "the ship's rapid rate of closing gave them little time to avoid a collision"
coming, approach, approaching - the act of drawing spatially closer to something; "the hunter's approach scattered the geese"
2.closure - a rule for limiting or ending debate in a deliberative body
parliamentary law, parliamentary procedure, rules of order, order - a body of rules followed by an assembly
closure by compartment, guillotine - closure imposed on the debate of specific sections of a bill
3.closure - a Gestalt principle of organization holding that there is an innate tendency to perceive incomplete objects as complete and to close or fill gaps and to perceive asymmetric stimuli as symmetric
Gestalt law of organization, Gestalt principle of organization - a principle of Gestalt psychology that identifies factors leading to particular forms of perceptual organization
4.closure - something settled or resolved; the outcome of decision making; "they finally reached a settlement with the union"; "they never did achieve a final resolution of their differences"; "he needed to grieve before he could achieve a sense of closure"
deciding, decision making - the cognitive process of reaching a decision; "a good executive must be good at decision making"
5.closure - an obstruction in a pipe or tubeclosure - an obstruction in a pipe or tube; "we had to call a plumber to clear out the blockage in the drainpipe"
breech closer, breechblock - a metal block in breech-loading firearms that is withdrawn to insert a cartridge and replaced to close the breech before firing
impedimenta, obstruction, obstructor, obstructer, impediment - any structure that makes progress difficult
plug, stopple, stopper - blockage consisting of an object designed to fill a hole tightly
vapor lock, vapour lock - a stoppage in a pipeline caused by gas bubbles (especially a stoppage that develops in hot weather in an internal-combustion engine when fuel in the gas line boils and forms bubbles that block the flow of gasoline to the carburetor)
6.closure - the act of blockingclosure - the act of blocking      
obstruction - the act of obstructing; "obstruction of justice"
implosion - the initial occluded phase of a stop consonant
7.closure - termination of operations; "they regretted the closure of the day care center"
ending, termination, conclusion - the act of ending something; "the termination of the agreement"
plant closing - act of shutting down operation of a plant
bank closing - act of closing down a bank because of a fiscal emergency or failure
layoff - the act of laying off an employee or a work force
Verb1.closure - terminate debate by calling for a vote; "debate was closured"; "cloture the discussion"
terminate, end - bring to an end or halt; "She ended their friendship when she found out that he had once been convicted of a crime"; "The attack on Poland terminated the relatively peaceful period after WW I"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

closure

noun closing, end, finish, conclusion, stoppage, termination, cessation the closure of the Ravenscraig steelworks
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

closure

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
إِغْلَاقإغلاق، إقْفال
uzávěruzavřenízavření
afslutninglukningnedlukning
sulkeminen
zatvaranje
lokun
閉鎖
종결
uždarymas
slēgšana
domknięciezamknięcie
uzavretie
avslutninghölje
การปิด
kapa makapanış
sự đóng kín

closure

[ˈkləʊʒəʳ] N
1. (= close-down) → cierre m
2. (= end) → fin m, conclusión f
3. (Parl) → clausura f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

closure

[ˈkləʊʒər] n
(= closing) → fermeture f
(psychological) to get closure on sth, to achieve closure on sth → tourner la page sur qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

closure

n
(= act of closing)Schließung f; (of road)Sperrung f; (of wound, incision)Schließen nt; (of factory, mine etc also)Stilllegung f
(Parl) → Schluss mder Debatte; to move the closureden Schluss der Debatte beantragen; to apply the closure to a debatedas Ende einer Debatte erklären
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

closure

[ˈkləʊʒəʳ] nchiusura
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

closure

(ˈkləuʒə) noun
an act of closing. the closure of a factory.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

closure

إِغْلَاق uzavření lukning Schließung κλείσιμο cierre sulkeminen fermeture zatvaranje chiusura 閉鎖 종결 sluiting avslutning zamknięcie encerramento, fechamento закрытие avslutning การปิด kapanış sự đóng kín 关闭
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

clo·sure

n. acto de cerrar o sellar; encierro.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

closure

n (psych) cierre m emocional, sensación f de conclusión; (surg) cierre m; vacuum-assisted — cierre asistido por vacío
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.