clownish


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Related to clownish: Clownfish

clown

 (kloun)
n.
1.
a. A buffoon or jester who entertains by jokes, antics, and tricks in a circus, play, or other presentation.
b. One who jokes and plays tricks.
2. A coarse, rude, vulgar person; a boor.
3. A peasant; a rustic.
intr.v. clowned, clown·ing, clowns
1. To behave like a buffoon or jester.
2. To perform as a buffoon or jester.
3. To krump, especially in clown makeup.

[Of Scandinavian origin (akin to Icelandic klunni, clumsy person) or of Low German origin.]

clown′er n.
clown′ish adj.
clown′ish·ly adv.
clown′ish·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.clownish - like a clownclownish - like a clown; "a buffoonish walk"; "a clownish face"; "a zany sense of humor"
humorous, humourous - full of or characterized by humor; "humorous stories"; "humorous cartoons"; "in a humorous vein"
Translations
تَهْريجي، كالبَهْلول
šaškovský
tåbelig
bohóckodó
fíflalegur, klaufskur
šašovský
soytarı gibi

clownish

[ˈklaʊnɪʃ] ADJ [person] → cómico; [behaviour] → de payaso; [sense of humour] → de payaso, tonto

clownish

[ˈklaʊnɪʃ] adj [appearance, behaviour] → clownesque

clownish

adjalbern, clownesk (geh)

clownish

[ˈklaʊnɪʃ] adjclaunesco/a

clown

(klaun) noun
1. a person who works in a circus, performing funny acts (usually ridiculously dressed).
2. any person who behaves ridiculously.
verb
to behave ridiculously. Stop clowning.
ˈclownish adjective
References in classic literature ?
``Yea, but,'' answered the Disinherited Knight, thou hast ever kept me in anxiety lest thy clownish bearing should discover thee.''
The goatherd's tale gave great satisfaction to all the hearers, and the canon especially enjoyed it, for he had remarked with particular attention the manner in which it had been told, which was as unlike the manner of a clownish goatherd as it was like that of a polished city wit; and he observed that the curate had been quite right in saying that the woods bred men of learning.
One of those who supported it, leaving the burden to his comrades, advanced to meet him, flourishing a forked stick that he had for propping up the stand when resting, and with this he caught a mighty cut Don Quixote made at him that severed it in two; but with the portion that remained in his hand he dealt such a thwack on the shoulder of Don Quixote's sword arm (which the buckler could not protect against the clownish assault) that poor Don Quixote came to the ground in a sad plight.
At the beginning of the feast a tall, clownish young man knelt before the Queen of the Fairies asking as a boon that to him might be given the first adventure that might befall.
Then the "clownish person" started up and demanded the adventure.
I had no right to expect much, and I did not expect much; but I had no idea that he could be so very clownish, so totally without air.
If I had, I could have wept sentimental tears to-night, and the clownish antics of that precious pair would have but enhanced the beauty of their voices and the beauty of the accompanying orchestra.
He has won over many Britons who have grown disheartened with a political establishment seen as preoccupied with the London elite, but his detractors believe that his "clownish" character renders him unfit for the job.
Then he has to confront all of his clownish fears in finding the solution to a sudden murder case.
In his new film, the darkly comic dramedy "To Dust," Rohrig plays a slightly clownish, slightly morose contemporary Hasidic cantor named Shmuel at a synagogue in upstate New York.
It's all fun and games if it were only his clownish disposition that was the topic of discussion, but the man doesn't stop at that and has been known to be rather curt and acerbic to individuals posted on duty.
Whether it's an electric eye or look-at-me lip, the chicest way to go bold is by bedecking one area of your face--then keep the rest of your look low-key to avoid a clownish effect.