clubwoman


Also found in: Wikipedia.

club·wom·an

 (klŭb′wo͝om′ən)
n.
A woman who is a member of a club or clubs, especially one who is active in club life.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

clubwoman

(ˈklʌbˌwʊmən)
n, pl -women
a woman who is an enthusiastic member of a club or clubs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
McEvoy is a St Sylvester's clubwoman, alongside Dublin skipper Sinead Aherne and fellow forward Nicole Owens.
The St Sylvester's clubwoman had a different view for the 2015 All-Ireland final though.
Clubwoman as Feminist: True, Womanhood Redefined, 1868-1914.
(271) It was not until 1918 when clubwoman Grace Wilson, a probation officer for the Negro Fellowship League and "house mother" for the Industrial School for Girls, became the first black policewoman in both Chicago and in the United States.
Washington selected and arranged by clubwoman Victoria Earle Matthews in 1898 and later re-released in 1995 as Black Diamonds: The Wisdom of Booker T.
Paul's Chapel near Wall Street announced plans to open a lunch club where "girls of refinement" could enjoy time away from the offices that were "deleterious to their moral welfare." A Boston clubwoman proposed that Massachusetts enact a law requiring that stenographers be surrounded by wire cages so they could work unmolested by men.
A few key studies are Karen Blair, The Clubwoman as Feminist: True Womanhood Redefined, 1868-1914 (New York: Holmes & Meier Publishers, 1980); Sarah Deutsch, Women and the City: Gender, Space, and Power in Boston, 1870-1940 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000); Gayle Ann Gullett, Becoming Citizens: The Emergence and
(8) Too, a passage in The Squirrel Cage about a "Women's Literary Club" echoes the satiric tone taken toward such organizations by the brash young Cather both during her university days and as a novice journalist--a kind of spouting off that she acknowledged in a letter to Canfield of 21 March 1921, where she joked, "I'm not at all fierce anymore--unless you bring a clubwoman!" Moreover, Canfield used the feminine form of Alexander, Alexandra, for a minor character in The Squirrel Cage, published the same year as Cather's Alexander's Bridge.
However, in the same year, Irene McCoy Gaines, a prominent Chicago clubwoman who had recently been appointed an executive to the ASNLH's national council, blocked the group from obtaining a charter for a chapter.
Clubwoman Rose Wallace was crucial to the creation and operation of Tehachapi and yet often ran afoul of both male politicians and other clubwomen, most notably over the firing of superintendent Florence Monahan in 1939.
Agnes Morely Cleaveland (1874-1958) was a rancher, writer and clubwoman who was born in New Mexico at the height of the range wars.
Malcolm refused to have any part in this litigation, the plaintiff being a prominent clubwoman and friend of his wife.