clung


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clung

 (klŭng)
v.
Past tense and past participle of cling.

clung

(klʌŋ)
vb
the past tense and past participle of cling

cling

(klɪŋ)

v. clung, cling•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to adhere closely; stick to: Wet paper clings to glass.
2. to hold tight, as by grasping or embracing; cleave: The child clung to her mother.
3. to remain attached, as to an idea, hope, memory, etc.
4. to cohere.
n.
5. the act of clinging; adherence.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English clingan to stick together, shrink, wither; akin to clench]
cling′er, n.
cling′ing•ly, adv.
References in classic literature ?
With the strength of desperation he clung to the cordage, seeking frantically to entangle his legs and body in it.
He was carried within reach of the cordage where the warrior still clung, though with rapidly diminishing strength.
It was the human contact she clung to, but she was not the less sinking into the dark gulf.
As Hetty said the last words, she clung closer to Dinah, shuddering.
Darya Alexandrovna, struggling painfully with her skirts that clung round her legs, was not walking, but running, her eyes fixed on the children.
The nurse was not wet on the lower part of her dress, but Kitty was drenched through, and her soaked clothes clung to her.
All that day I floated up and down, now beaten this way, now that, and when night fell I despaired for my life; but, weary and spent as I was, I clung to my frail support, and great was my joy when the morning light showed me that I had drifted against an island.
They had gone in the direction of the village of the Gomangani, that much had Manu seen with his own eyes, so the ape-man swung on through the jungle in a southerly direction and though with no concentrated effort to follow the spoor of those he trailed, he passed numerous evidences that they had gone this way--faint suggestions of their scent spoor clung lightly to leaf or branch or bole that one or the other had touched, or in the earth of the trail their feet had trod, and where the way wound through the gloomy depth of dank forest, the impress of their shoes still showed occasionally in the damp mass of decaying vegetation that floored the way.
At such moments, starting from a windward roll, I would go flying through the air with dizzying swiftness, as though I clung to the end of a huge, inverted pendulum, the arc of which, between the greater rolls, must have been seventy feet or more.
But to him, in appearance and action and impulse, still clung the Wild.
All night Momaya clung to her perch, for although the lion sought other prey after a short time, she dared not descend into the darkness again, for fear she might encounter him or another of his kind; but at daylight she clambered down and resumed her way.
They clung to the tree until they found the water flowing the right way, when they let go and permitted the raft to resume its voyage.