clyster


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clys·ter

 (klĭs′tər)
n.
An enema.

[Middle English clister, from Old French clistere, from Latin clyster, from Greek klustēr, clyster pipe, from kluzein, to wash out.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

clyster

(ˈklɪstə)
n
(Medicine) med a former name for an enema
[C14: from Greek klustēr, from kluzein to rinse]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

clys•ter

(ˈklɪs tər)

n.
an enema.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin < Greek klystḗr <*klyd-, base of klýzein to rinse out (compare cataclysm)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clyster - an injection of a liquid through the anus to stimulate evacuationclyster - an injection of a liquid through the anus to stimulate evacuation; sometimes used for diagnostic purposes
irrigation - (medicine) cleaning a wound or body organ by flushing or washing out with water or a medicated solution
colonic, colonic irrigation - a water enema given to flush out the colon
barium enema - enema in which a contrast medium (usually barium sulfate) is injected into the rectum and X-rays are taken to search for lesions
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
No case of ileus occurred during the short-term or long-term postoperative period in Group A (two patients were lost to follow-up), but six cases in Group B developed ileus during hospitalization; their symptoms improved after therapy including jejunitis, gastrointestinal decompression, ambulation, and glycerin enema clyster. Six months after the operation, eight patients were lost to follow-up and five patients suffered from intestinal obstruction.
clyster because it washes and clears hot, irritating materials.
(10.) Bromley, "Rimming," 179, 172; Will Stockton, Playing Dirty: Sexuality and Waste in Early Modern Comedy (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2011), xix; Ben Saunders, "Iago's Clyster: Purgation, Anality, and the Civilizing Process," Shakespeare Quarterly 55, no.
The final entry introduces Allais updating readers in 1897 about how his target is doing, and introduces a device, the "auto-clyster." Wikipedia states that clyster is an old word for enema.
Medicine did not work till a clyster was applied, which was operated well and afforded him temporary relief through the day.
In "Iago's Clyster: Purgation, Anality, and the Civilizing Process," Shakespeare Quarterly 55.2 (Summer 2004), Ben Saunders explores the ways that Iago presents Desdemona as a creature who sexually gorges herself until sick with excess; see 153-55.
(21.) In mountebank/commedia sketches the doctor figure is often portrayed administering a clyster through a syringe.
For more severe pain a clyster is useful, with a hot poultice upon the cheeks, (14) and hot water containing certain medicaments held in the mouth and frequently changed.