cnidarian


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cni·dar·i·an

 (nī-dâr′ē-ən)
n.
Any of various invertebrate animals of the phylum Cnidaria, characterized by a radially symmetrical body with a saclike internal cavity and stinging nematocysts, and including the jellyfishes, hydras, sea anemones, and corals.

[New Latin Cnīdāria, phylum name, from Greek knīdē, sea nettle.]

cni·dar′i·an adj.

cnidarian

(naɪˈdɛərɪən; knaɪ-)
n
(Animals) any invertebrate of the phylum Cnidaria, which comprises the coelenterates
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Cnidaria
[C20: from New Latin Cnidaria, from Greek knidē nettle]

cni•dar•i•an

(naɪˈdɛər i ən)

n.
1. any radially symmetric invertebrate of the phylum Cnidaria, including the hydras, jellyfishes, sea anemones, and corals, characterized by stinging cells and a saclike digestive cavity with a single opening surrounded by tentacles. Compare coelenterate.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to the cnidarians.
[1930–35; < New Latin Cnidari(a) (see cnida, -aria) + -an1]

cni·dar·i·an

(nī-dâr′ē-ən)
Any of various invertebrate animals that have a body with radial symmetry, tentacles, and a sac-like internal cavity. They have a single opening for ingesting food and eliminating wastes. Cnidarians include the jellyfishes, hydras, sea anemones, and corals. Also called coelenterate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cnidarian - radially symmetrical animals having saclike bodies with only one opening and tentacles with stinging structurescnidarian - radially symmetrical animals having saclike bodies with only one opening and tentacles with stinging structures; they occur in polyp and medusa forms
coelenteron - the saclike body cavity of a coelenterate
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
Cnidaria, Coelenterata, phylum Cnidaria, phylum Coelenterata - hydras; polyps; jellyfishes; sea anemones; corals
polyp - one of two forms that coelenterates take (e.g. a hydra or coral): usually sedentary with a hollow cylindrical body usually with a ring of tentacles around the mouth; "in some species of coelenterate, polyps are a phase in the life cycle that alternates with a medusoid phase"
medusan, medusoid, medusa - one of two forms that coelenterates take: it is the free-swimming sexual phase in the life cycle of a coelenterate; in this phase it has a gelatinous umbrella-shaped body and tentacles
jellyfish - any of numerous usually marine and free-swimming coelenterates that constitute the sexually reproductive forms of hydrozoans and scyphozoans
scyphozoan - any of various usually free-swimming marine coelenterates having a gelatinous medusoid stage as the dominant phase of its life cycle
hydroid, hydrozoan - colonial coelenterates having the polyp phase dominant
actinozoan, anthozoan - sessile marine coelenterates including solitary and colonial polyps; the medusoid phase is entirely suppressed
Translations
žahavec
cnidario
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists know little about cnidarian launch mechanisms.
When the top1 gene hit of ORF was similar to cnidarian or Syinbiodinium sequences, the ORF was assigned as the host or symbiont-derived sequence, respectively.
Together, these results showed that high temperature, independent of pC[O.sub.2] level, was a primary cause of coral bleaching, and suggest that variations in bleaching among coral colonies (Edmunds, 1994; Baird et al., 2009) are attributed to intraspecific genetic variation in cnidarian hosts.
Cellular mechanisms of cnidarian bleaching: stress causes the collapse of symbiosis.
However, some of the most investigated organisms in regard to regeneration are the planarians and the cnidarian polyps, which both have impressive regenerative powers (Salo, 2006; Gold and Jacobs, 2013).
Relative contributions of various cellular mechanisms to loss of algae during cnidarian bleaching.
Jellyfish species (of the cnidarian subphylum Medusozoa) typically possess a benthic, sessile stage (polyp) that reproduces asexually by budding new polyps or medusae, the latter of which represent the sexually reproductive stage of the textbook medusozoan life cycle.
High-resolution electron microscopy revealed for the first time in cnidarian collagen the interwoven, three-dimensional arrangement of the fibrils that comprise the fibers.
Some cells of the cnidarian mesoglea historically have been reported to include putative immunocytes (Chapman, 1974; reviewed in Bigger and Hildemann, 1982) in the form of "granular amoebocytes." Because these immunocytes have been described as phagocytic, they should be involved in any foreign body response and wound healing, and thus carry antimicrobial substances (enzymes, peptides, and oxidative burst capacity).
culture derived from the cnidarian host corallimorph Rhodactis [Heteractis] lucida, and Cytophaga sp.