co-opetition


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co-opetition

(ˌkəʊɒpəˈtɪʃən)
n
(Commerce) cooperation between competitors in business, esp in the computer industry
References in periodicals archive ?
At NewSchools we call this "co-opetition." Entrepreneurs can spark change through competitive pressure, through collaboration, or both.
E-DRM (or IRM) software is filling security needs in a global business environment of increasing collaboration, integration, alliances and cooperation with competitors ("co-opetition").
In the print space, O'Reilly and Pearson are head-to-head competitors--on the Web it's "co-opetition." They saw that paid access to their content online represents a big future opportunity.
Finally, co-opetition is a common relationship for logistics companies that cooperate horizontally.
This 21st century model of "co-opetition" will be key to adapting to 21st century work force challenges.
Is it purely competitive, or "co-opetition," or benign partner?
The first is Co-opetition, a glib yet useful book by Harvard Business School's Adam Brandenburger and Yale School of Management's Barry Nalebuff.
It's why we have so eagerly embraced Barry Nalebuff's idea of "co-opetition"--cooperation by the field to grow the resources for the entire community--an approach underlying our audience initiative described in last month's editorial and that we hope to expand in October 2006.
The authors argue that apparently conflicting schools of business thought, one espousing 'co-opetition', the other focusing on core competencies are not mutually exclusive.
But most of the literature, such as the 1998 book Co-opetition (Brandenburger, et al) focuses on complementary efforts--on businesses doing different things that complement each other.
"Co-opetition" is the term given to the inescapable cooperation required between competitors so that, paradoxically, they can better compete.
On the negative side of the co-opetition equation, the competitive spirit is intense.