co-parent


Also found in: Idioms, Wikipedia.

co-par·ent·ing

(kō-pâr′ən-tĭng, -păr′-)
n.
1. The sharing of parental responsibility by the divorced parents of a child.
2. Joint or shared custody of a child by divorced parents.

co′-par′ent n.

co-par•ent

or co•par•ent

(koʊˈpɛər ənt, -ˈpær-)

n.
1. a divorced or separated parent who shares equally with the other parent in the custody and care of a child.
v.t.
2. to act as a co-parent to (a child).
v.i.
3. to act as a co-parent.
References in periodicals archive ?
ET's Brice Sander sat down with Chyna at her Lashed Cosmetics booth at RuPaul's DragCon LA 2019 on Sunday, where she opened up about how she and Rob have moved past the drama to successfully co-parent their 2-year-old daughter, Dream.
After that, we're going to co-parent, depending on agreement of who will have the child primarily.
Both parents have agreed to divide Ellie's time between the two of them as they co-parent her.
The Mr & Mrs Smith stars are now drawing up dates to get together and work on their new co-parent roles after sorting out the custody of their six kids.
But we love each other as family, we co-parent our children, and they have amazing step-parents in Jo and Lincoln.
The 41-year-old actress has announced that she and Christopher Jarecki have decided to go their separate ways after 13 years of marriage, but they still"love and respect each other" and will co-parent their six-year-old son Bear Blu.
His wife and I have become close and we all co-parent our kids extremely well (their three boys and my two kids live with us all the time).
Notably absent are mentions of positive co-parent relationships, any mention of the father/child bond, or any sense that formal child support counts in fathers' minds as a form of provision.
The post Kevin Hart's ex-wife wants to co-parent new baby appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
With increasing populations experiencing divorce and little known how divorced parents co-parent, understanding how divorced mothers manage co-parenting for their children with chronic illness may help nurses support divorce families, help the father understand the mother's perspectives, and improve outcomes for children.
Self-employed mum-of-two Sarah Hall, from North Tyneside, said: "I run my own business and co-parent our two boys with my ex husband.