coadaptation


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Related to coadaptation: coaptation splint

co·a·dapt·ed

 (kō′ə-dăp′tĭd)
adj.
1. Of or relating to characteristics of two or more species that have evolved through mutually beneficial interactions between the species.
2. Of or relating to alleles at two or more genetic loci that have become established because they are beneficial in combination with each other, but not with other alleles.

co′ad·ap·ta′tion (-ăd-ăp-tā′shən) n.

coadaptation

(kəʊˌædæpˈteɪʃən)
n
the state of two or more things adapting to one another

co•ad•ap•ta•tion

(ˌkoʊ æd əpˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the correlation of characteristics in two or more interacting organisms or organs resulting from progressive accommodation by natural selection.
2. Also called integration. the accumulation in a population's gene pool of genes that interact by harmonious epistasis in the development of an organism.
[1830–40]
co`ad•ap•ta′tion•al, adj.
co`ad•ap•ta′tion•al•ly, adv.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Nevertheless, such a conclusion, even if well founded, would be unsatisfactory, until it could be shown how the innumerable species inhabiting this world have been modified, so as to acquire that perfection of structure and coadaptation which most justly excites our admiration.
It is, therefore, of the highest importance to gain a clear insight into the means of modification and coadaptation. At the commencement of my observations it seemed to me probable that a careful study of domesticated animals and of cultivated plants would offer the best chance of making out this obscure problem.
The author of the 'Vestiges of Creation' would, I presume, say that, after a certain unknown number of generations, some bird had given birth to a woodpecker, and some plant to the misseltoe, and that these had been produced perfect as we now see them; but this assumption seems to me to be no explanation, for it leaves the case of the coadaptations of organic beings to each other and to their physical conditions of life, untouched and unexplained.
2000: Phylogenetic analysis of coadaptation in behavior, diet, and body size in the African antelope.
LHD have three characteristics: flexibility, demonstration, and coadaptation (Ma et al., 2014).
He pointed out that millions of years of coadaptation caused host-endosymbiont equilibrium when none of the participants in relationship lose a lot.
Coadaptation of Helicobacter pylori and humans: Ancient history, modern implications.
The close and prolonged association of these viruses with their host over its entire lifetime with only rare impairment of nervous system function implies an exquisite degree of host-virus coadaptation. On occasion stability of this commensal symbiotic host-virus relationship can be altered, resulting in severe or even fatal disease often involving the central nervous system (CNS).
Identification of positive selection genetic signatures in the genomes can help us to understand the kinetics and directions of continuing host-pathogen coadaptation and impact on their diagnosis, transmission, fitness, immunogenicity, and pathogenicity.
The ratio of one to two can be called agreement, or accord, or singing or, more suitably, consonance, which is the great power in all composite structures, or better perhaps, the "coadaptation of creatures" I am reminded that the word co-adaptation is harmony ([phrase omitted]) in Greek.
Phylogenetic studies of coadaptation: preferred temperatures versus optimal performance temperature in lizards.
Salakhutdinov, Improving neural networks by preventing coadaptation of feature detectors, Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition.