coalitionism

coalitionism

(ˌkəʊəˈlɪʃənɪzəm)
n
the principle of governing by coalition
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The Communist rebellion against the Socialists arose from an alliance between the revolutionary idealism of women workers with the cloakmakers' rebellion against cross-class coalitionism. The high point of the rebellion was the 1926 Communist-led male cloakmakers' strike, an event that fits rather poorly into Bender's schema.
34-45; Joseph Lookstein, "Coalitionism and Separatism in the American Jewish Community," in Tradition 15:4 (1976), pp.
The result of this would be a hegemony of New Labour, the end of purposeful opposition, specious coalitionism and a Britain without economic authority in Europe.
More consensual government was to be pursued, not by increasing accountability to voters but by institutionalising coalitionism. This would undermine one of the traditional virtues of the British system -- the electorate's ability to remove an unpopular government; and it would also provide a contrast with the objectives of Victorian reformers.