cobalamin

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co·bal·a·min

 (kō-băl′ə-mĭn) also co·bal·a·mine (-mēn′)
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cobalamin

(kəʊˈbæləmɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) vitamin B12
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vitamin B1


n.
[1920–25]

vitamin B2


n.
[1925–30]

vitamin B3


n.
[1975–80]

vitamin B6


n.
[1930–35]

vitamin B12


n.
a complex water-soluble solid, C63H88N14O14PCo, obtained from liver, milk, eggs, fish, oysters, and clams: a deficiency causes pernicious anemia and disorders of the nervous system. Also called cyanocobalamin, cobalamin, extrinsic factor.
[1945–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·bal·a·min

(kō-băl′ə-mĭn)
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cobalamin - a B vitamin that is used to treat pernicious anemiacobalamin - a B vitamin that is used to treat pernicious anemia
B complex, B vitamin, B-complex vitamin, vitamin B, vitamin B complex, B - originally thought to be a single vitamin but now separated into several B vitamins
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To observe the effect of the different cobalamins, clinically relevant doses were incubated with the model.
Jacobsen, "Accurate assessment and identification of naturally occurring cellular cobalamins," Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, vol.
Cobalamins are known to have effects on *NO [27-29], but these have hitherto been thought to be a consequence of Cbl/*NO scavenging effects [7,30-35] demonstrable chemically and in vitro [36,37], but biologically unproven in vivo and still controversial [38-40].
Plasma holotranscobalamin compared with plasma cobalamins for assessment of vitamin [B.sub.12] absorption; optimisation of a non-radioactive vitamin [B.sub.12] absorption test (CobaSorb).
NO is known to react with heme proteins, porphyrins, and cobalamins to form nitrosyl-metal complexes (32-36).
Vitamin B12 is actually a family of compounds called cobalamins, each of which has its own potential biological activity, in terms of absorption and potency.
Scientifically, vitamin B12 is one in a family of compounds called cobalamins. Each form has its own potential biological activity in terms of absorption and potency.
Vitamin [B.sub.12] is usually used as a generic term representing various cobalt-containing tetrapyrrole rings with attached nucleotide side chains that are chemically classified as cobalamins or corrinoids.
Serum cobalamins in the elderly: a longitudinal study of a representative population sample from age 70 to 81.
Carmel was the first to report that total haptocorrin (HC) and cobalamins are related and that this relationship may be associated with the occurrence of heterozygosity for HC deficiency (1).