cobbler


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cob·bler 1

 (kŏb′lər)
n.
1. One who mends or makes boots and shoes.
2. Archaic One who is clumsy at work; a bungler.

[Middle English cobeler.]

cob·bler 2

 (kŏb′lər)
n.
1. A deep-dish fruit pie with a thick top crust.
2. An iced drink made of wine or liqueur, sugar, and citrus fruit.

[Origin unknown.]

cobbler

(ˈkɒblə)
n
(Crafts) a person who makes or mends shoes
[C13 (as surname): of unknown origin]

cobbler

(ˈkɒblə)
n
1. (Cookery) a sweetened iced drink, usually made from fruit and wine or liqueur
2. (Cookery) chiefly US a hot dessert made of fruit covered with a rich cakelike crust
[C19: (for sense 1) perhaps shortened from cobbler's punch; (for both senses) compare cobble (vb)]

cob•bler

(ˈkɒb lər)

n.
1. a person who mends shoes.
2. a deep-dish fruit pie with a thick biscuit crust, usu. only on top.
3. an iced drink of wine or liquor with fruit and sugar.
4. Archaic. a clumsy workman.
[1250–1300; Middle English cobelere=cobel- (of obscure orig.) + -ere -er1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cobbler - a person who makes or repairs shoescobbler - a person who makes or repairs shoes
boot maker, bootmaker - a maker of boots
maker, shaper - a person who makes things
2.cobbler - tall sweetened iced drink of wine or liquor with fruit
highball - a mixed drink made of alcoholic liquor mixed with water or a carbonated beverage and served in a tall glass
3.cobbler - a pie made of fruit with rich biscuit dough usually only on top of the fruit
pie - dish baked in pastry-lined pan often with a pastry top
Translations
إسْكافي
švec
skomager
foltozóvarga
skósmiîur
ayakkabı tamircisi

cobbler

[ˈkɒbləʳ] Nzapatero/a m/f (remendón/ona)

cobbler

[ˈkɒblər] ncordonnier m

cobbler

n
Schuster m, → Flickschuster m
(= drink)Cobbler m; (esp US: = fruit pie) Obst mit Teig überbacken

cobbler

[ˈkɒbləʳ] ncalzolaio

cobble2

(ˈkobl) verb
1. to mend (shoes).
2. to make or repair badly or roughly.
ˈcobbler noun
a person who mends shoes.
References in classic literature ?
A COBBLER unable to make a living by his trade and made desperate by poverty, began to practice medicine in a town in which he was not known.
It seemed as though Saint Dunstan was like to answer his prayer, for along the road came plodding a certain cobbler, one Quince, of Derby, who had been to take a pair of shoes to a farmer nigh Kirk Langly, and was now coming back home again, with a fair boiled capon in his pouch and a stout pottle of beer by his side, which same the farmer had given him for joy of such a stout pair of shoon.
In this place half an hour afterwards he was found by Gibbs, the village cobbler, who had been sent for him in some haste.
I like to take in hand none but clean, virgin, fair-and-square mathematical jobs, something that regularly begins at the beginning, and is at the middle when midway, and comes to an end at the conclusion; not a cobbler's job, that's at an end in the middle, and at the beginning at the end.
One afternoon, near the end of the first summer, when I went to the village to get a shoe from the cobbler's, I was seized and put into jail, because, as I have elsewhere related, I did not pay a tax to, or recognize the authority of, the State which buys and sells men, women, and children, like cattle, at the door of its senate-house.
They knew perfectly well what was cooking at every fire throughout the city, from the chamberlain's to the cobbler's; the court-ladies danced and clapped their hands.
In all their variety of occupation,--the cobbler, the blacksmith, the soldier, the lady with her fan, the toper with his bottle, the milkmaid sitting by her, cow--this fortunate little society might truly be said to enjoy a harmonious existence, and to make life literally a dance.
One day, taking a pair of shoes to be mended, he saw the cobbler's wife seated by the fire, suffering from the terrible symptoms of heart-disease and dropsy, which he had witnessed as the precursors of his mother's death.
He lives on the Hill, back of the Mayfair bakery, runnin' a cobbler's shop that everybody knows, and you'll have no trouble.
The thought pleased the good cobbler very much; and one evening, when all the things were ready, they laid them on the table, instead of the work that they used to cut out, and then went and hid themselves, to watch what the little elves would do.
Suppose a carpenter to be doing the business of a cobbler, or a cobbler of a carpenter; and suppose them to exchange their implements or their duties, or the same person to be doing the work of both, or whatever be the change; do you think that any great harm would result to the State?
That is, I believe it, perhaps, but at the same time I feel and suspect that I am lying like a cobbler.