cobnut


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Related to cobnut: Malvolio

cob·nut

 (kŏb′nŭt′)
n.
1. The large edible nut of a cultivated variety of hazel.
2. The plant bearing this fruit.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cobnut

(ˈkɒbˌnʌt) or

cob

n
(Plants) other names for a hazelnut
[C16: from earlier cobylle nut; see cobble1, nut]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cob•nut

(ˈkɒbˌnʌt)

n.
1. the nut of certain cultivated varieties of hazel, Corylus avellana grandis.
2. a tree bearing such nuts.
[1400–50; late Middle English cobylle nutt. See cobble1, nut]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cobnut - small nut-bearing tree much grown in Europecobnut - small nut-bearing tree much grown in Europe
hazelnut, hazelnut tree, hazel - any of several shrubs or small trees of the genus Corylus bearing edible nuts enclosed in a leafy husk
2.cobnut - nut of any of several trees of the genus Corylus
edible nut - a hard-shelled seed consisting of an edible kernel or meat enclosed in a woody or leathery shell
hazelnut, hazelnut tree, hazel - any of several shrubs or small trees of the genus Corylus bearing edible nuts enclosed in a leafy husk
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cobnut

[ˈkɒbˌnʌt] nnocciola
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Is it marls (marbles) or cobnuts?" Maggie's heart sank a little, because Tom always said it was "no good" playing with her at those games, she played so badly.
no; I've swopped all my marls with the little fellows, and cobnuts are no fun, you silly, only when the nuts are green.
This was in addition to the 2,000 snowdrops, 2,000 winter aconites and 500 foxgloves planted in February, plus the rowan, cherry, cobnut, hazel and fruiting hawthorn Trees, planted in January.
Lyan Scotch with Hereford blackcurrant, cobnut, and smoked-barley amazake
The is the The fruit of the horse chestnut tree was first used for conker fights 200 years ago as a replacement to hazel, cobnut and snail shells.
However, he admires wholeheartedly the Socrates "who never refused to play cobnut with children or to ride a hobbyhorse with them," (35) and he approves of the legendary "theological drinking and feasting" at the Sorbonne.
Take S the latest menu for example: foie gras ice-cream; cherry ravioli and Iberico ham; black cherry and foie gras terrine with palm sugar mousse, and grilled salad with truffle custard, cheese foam and cobnut crisp.
Cumbrian chef Simon Rogan, meanwhile, goes down the green route with grilled salad, truffle custard, cheese foam and cobnut crisp.
beer JLong HOP TO IT J Pickers at work of to DELICACY JCromer crab SWEET SWEET JA cobnut FISHY STUFF Giles gets to grips with grub MOVING walk to dinner plate
His finest hour came at Newmarket in August 1981 when, in the unspeakably lowly Cobnut Claiming Handicap, he came charging home to win at 33-1.
In 1532 Sir Thomas More imagined a bad schoolboy playing games instead of going to school: `cherrystone, marrow bone, buckle-pit, spurn point, cobnut, or quoiting'.