cobweb


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cob·web

 (kŏb′wĕb′)
n.
1.
a. A spiderweb, especially an old one that is covered in dust.
b. A single thread spun by a spider.
2. Something resembling a spiderweb in gauziness or flimsiness: "An extraordinary number of elegant ladies ... flowed in, heels clicking, diamonds flashing, adjusting tiny cobwebs of priceless lace on immaculate coiffures" (Jane Stevenson).
3. An intricate plot; a snare: caught in a cobweb of espionage and intrigue.
4. cobwebs Confusion; disorder: cobwebs on the brain.
tr.v. cob·webbed, cob·web·bing, cob·webs
To cover with or as if with cobwebs.

[Middle English coppeweb : coppe, spider (short for attercoppe, from Old English āttercoppe : ātor, poison + copp, head) + web, web; see web.]

cob′web′by adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cobweb

(ˈkɒbˌwɛb)
n
1. (Zoology) a web spun by certain spiders, esp those of the family Theridiidae, often found in the corners of disused rooms
2. (Zoology) a single thread of such a web
3. something like a cobweb, as in its flimsiness or ability to trap
[C14 cob, from coppe, from Old English (ātor)coppe spider; related to Middle Dutch koppe spider, Swedish (dialect) etterkoppa]
ˈcobˌwebbed adj
ˈcobˌwebby adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cob•web

(ˈkɒbˌwɛb)

n., v. -webbed, -web•bing. n.
1. a spiderweb, esp. when irregular.
2. anything finespun, flimsy, or insubstantial.
3. a network of plot or intrigue.
4. cobwebs, confusion or indistinctness: a head full of cobwebs.
v.t.
5. to cover with or as if with cobwebs.
[1275–1325; Middle English coppeweb, derivative of Old English -coppe spider (in ātorcoppe poison spider); c. Middle Dutch koppe; see web]
cob′web`by, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cobweb

- A single thread spun by a spider.
See also related terms for spider.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cobweb - a fabric so delicate and transparent as to resemble a web of a spider
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
2.cobweb - filaments from a web that was spun by a spidercobweb - filaments from a web that was spun by a spider
fibril, filament, strand - a very slender natural or synthetic fiber
3.cobweb - a dense elaborate spider web that is more efficient than the orb web
spider web, spider's web - a web spun by spiders to trap insect prey
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بَيْتُ العَنْكَبُوتنَسيجُ بَيْتِ العَنْكَبوت
pavučina
spindelvæv
hämähäkinverkko
paučina
pókháló
kóngulóarvefur
くもの巣
거미집
voratinklis
zirnekļtīkls
pajčevina
spindelnät
ใยแมงมุม
mạng nhện

cobweb

[ˈkɒbweb] Ntelaraña f
to blow away the cobwebs (fig) → despejar la mente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cobweb

[ˈkɒbwɛb] n [spider] → toile f d'araignée
to blow away the cobwebs → faire peau neuve
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cobweb

n (= single thread, threads)Spinn(en)webe f; (= full cobweb)Spinnennetz nt; a brisk walk will blow away the cobwebs (fig)ein ordentlicher Spaziergang und man hat wieder einen klaren Kopf
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cobweb

[ˈkɒbˌwɛb] nragnatela
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cobweb

(ˈkobweb) noun
a spider's web. You can't have cleaned this room – there are cobwebs in the corner.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

cobweb

بَيْتُ العَنْكَبُوت pavučina spindelvæv Spinnennetz ιστός αράχνης telaraña hämähäkinverkko toile d’araignée paučina ragnatela くもの巣 거미집 spinnenweb spindelvev pajęczyna teia de aranha паутина spindelnät ใยแมงมุม örümcek ağı mạng nhện 蜘蛛网
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
But shortly afterwards he became entangled in the meshes of a cobweb and was eaten by a spider.
While they were doing this they discovered a lot of new and wonderful things that the pirates must have stolen from other ships: Kashmir shawls as thin as a cobweb, embroidered with flowers of gold; jars of fine tobacco from Jamaica; carved ivory boxes full of Russian tea; an old violin with a string broken and a picture on the back; a set of big chess-men, carved out of coral and amber; a walking-stick which had a sword inside it when you pulled the handle; six wine-glasses with turquoise and silver round the rims; and a lovely great sugar-bowl, made of mother o' pearl.
When the doctor's four guests heard him talk of his proposed experiment, they anticipated nothing more wonderful than the murder of a mouse in an air pump, or the examination of a cobweb by the microscope, or some similar nonsense, with which he was constantly in the habit of pestering his intimates.
Here, then, was Nicholl, his gun on the ground, forgetful of danger, trying if possible to save the victim from its cobweb prison.
Alive or dead a fish is technically fast, when it is connected with an occupied ship or boat, by any medium at all controllable by the occupant or occupants, -- a mast, an oar, a nine-inch cable, a telegraph wire, or a strand of cobweb, it is all the same.
You think your power's infinite as your malice, And would do all your anger prompts you to; But you must wait occasions, and obey them: Sail in an egg-shell, make a straw your mast, A cobweb all your cloth, and pass unseen, Till you have 'scaped the rocks that are about you.
Events seem to have enclosed us in a curious little cobweb. All the time we are struggling between the rankest primitivism and the most delicate intrigue.
You may often detect a yet smoother and darker water, separated from the rest as if by an invisible cobweb, boom of the water nymphs, resting on it.
Cobwebs were in the angles of the walls and depended from the ceiling like strips of rotting lace, making undulatory movements in the disturbed air.
For what is the array of the strongest ropes, the tallest spars and the stoutest canvas against the mighty breath of the infinite, but thistle stalks, cobwebs and gossamer?
An epergne or centrepiece of some kind was in the middle of this cloth; it was so heavily overhung with cobwebs that its form was quite undistinguishable; and, as I looked along the yellow expanse out of which I remember its seeming to grow, like a black fungus, I saw speckled-legged spiders with blotchy bodies running home to it, and running out from it, as if some circumstances of the greatest public importance had just transpired in the spider community.
He smoked a cob pipe and after his wife's death sat all day in his empty office close by a window that was covered with cobwebs. He never opened the win- dow.