cobwebbed


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cob·web

 (kŏb′wĕb′)
n.
1.
a. A spiderweb, especially an old one that is covered in dust.
b. A single thread spun by a spider.
2. Something resembling a spiderweb in gauziness or flimsiness: "An extraordinary number of elegant ladies ... flowed in, heels clicking, diamonds flashing, adjusting tiny cobwebs of priceless lace on immaculate coiffures" (Jane Stevenson).
3. An intricate plot; a snare: caught in a cobweb of espionage and intrigue.
4. cobwebs Confusion; disorder: cobwebs on the brain.
tr.v. cob·webbed, cob·web·bing, cob·webs
To cover with or as if with cobwebs.

[Middle English coppeweb : coppe, spider (short for attercoppe, from Old English āttercoppe : ātor, poison + copp, head) + web, web; see web.]

cob′web′by adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

cobwebbed

[ˈkɒbwebd] ADJcubierto de telarañas, lleno de telarañas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cobwebbed

[ˈkɒbwɛbd] adjcouvert(e) de toiles d'araignée
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cobwebbed

adjvoller Spinnweben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
By filtering his politics through Poltergeist, Sol'Sax both leavens his lead-pipe message and reminds us that the horrors we delight in when they crawl cobwebbed from some Hollywood basement have distinct historical roots.
DEMOLITION of some of the archaic cobwebbed traditions of the FA would be most welcome, but surely not the Twin Towers.
Holding our attention today is something of a magic trick, and Muniz has referred to himself as an "illusionist," both a cobwebbed term for magician and a winking dig at the modernist prohibition against pictorial illusion.