cocarcinogen


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to cocarcinogen: carcinogen

co·car·cin·o·gen

 (kō′kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kō-kär′sĭn-ə-jĕn′)
n.
A substance or factor that will not promote cancer by itself but can potentiate cancer when acting with carcinogenic agents.

co·car′cin·o·gen′ic (-sə-nə-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cocarcinogen

(ˌkəʊkɑːˈsɪnədʒən; ˌkəʊˈkɑːsɪnəˌdʒɛn)
n
a substance that can promote cancer when acting with other substances, but which does not promote cancer by itself
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
There is growing evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) may act as a cocarcinogen along with tobacco which eventually results in oral squamous cell carcinoma.
Recently, the anticarcinogen or cocarcinogen effects of vanillin were studied in azoxymethane- (AOM-) induced aberrant crypt foci- (ACF-) bearing rats.
Alcohol is not a carcinogen itself, but acts as a tumor promoter and possibly as a cocarcinogen. Alcohol also acts as a solvent and thus might increase the exposure to other carcinogens by enhancing the penetration of carcinogens into the cell [18].
The animal model studies were repeated in mice and hamsters to evaluate the potential of the SV40 virus as a carcinogen as well as a cocarcinogen, when tested in combination with asbestos, to cause MM.
In addition, arsenic as a carcinogen acts by inducing DNA hypomethylation to compliment devious gene expressions, and thus was regarded as a cocarcinogen or promoter of carcinogenesis [40].
Researchers also have no clear understanding of the potential mechanisms through which alcohol might act as a cocarcinogen at these sites (IARC 1988; Doll et al.
Identification of cytomegalovirus as a carcinogen, cocarcinogen, or simply a passenger in these disease states is still under investigation.