coccyx


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Related to coccyx: Coccyx pain
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coccyx

coc·cyx

(kŏk′sĭks)
n. pl. coc·cy·ges (kŏk-sī′jēz, kŏk′sĭ-jēz′) or coccyxes
A small triangular bone at the base of the spinal column in humans and other apes, consisting of several fused rudimentary vertebrae. Also called tailbone.

[New Latin coccȳx, from Greek kokkūx, cuckoo, coccyx (from its resemblance to a cuckoo's beak).]

coccyx

(ˈkɒksɪks)
n, pl coccyges (kɒkˈsaɪdʒiːz)
(Anatomy) a small triangular bone at the end of the spinal column in man and some apes, representing a vestigial tail
[C17: from New Latin, from Greek kokkux cuckoo, of imitative origin; from the likeness of the bone to a cuckoo's beak]
coccygeal, coccygian adj

coc•cyx

(ˈkɒk sɪks)

n., pl. coc•cy•ges (kɒkˈsaɪ dʒiz, ˈkɒk sɪˌdʒiz)
a triangular bone at the lower end of the spinal column; tailbone.
[1605–15; < New Latin < Greek kókkyx cuckoo, from its resemblance to a cuckoo's beak]
coc•cyg′e•al (-ˈsɪdʒ i əl) adj.

coc·cyx

(kŏk′sĭks)
A small triangular bone at the base of the spine in humans and tailless apes. It is composed of several fused vertebrae. Also called tailbone. See more at skeleton.

coccyx


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Four fused vertebrae forming the “tail” of the backbone.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coccyx - the end of the vertebral column in humans and tailless apescoccyx - the end of the vertebral column in humans and tailless apes
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
spinal column, spine, vertebral column, rachis, backbone, back - the series of vertebrae forming the axis of the skeleton and protecting the spinal cord; "the fall broke his back"
caudal vertebra, coccygeal vertebra - one of 4 vertebrae in the human coccyx
pelvic arch, pelvic girdle, pelvis, hip - the structure of the vertebrate skeleton supporting the lower limbs in humans and the hind limbs or corresponding parts in other vertebrates
Translations

coccyx

[ˈkɒksɪks] N (coccyges (pl)) [kɒkˈsaɪdʒiːz]cóccix m inv

coccyx

[ˈkɒksɪks] ncoccyx m inv

coccyx

nSteißbein nt

coccyx

[ˈkɒksɪks] n (Anat) → coccige m

coc·cyx

n. cóccix; último hueso de la columna vertebral;
pop. rabadilla.

coccyx

n cóccix or coxis m, colita (Amer, fam), rabadilla (Amer, fam)
References in periodicals archive ?
THE PELVIC fLoor Simple exercises to help you tone and strengthen The pelvic floor consists of layers of muscle and ligaments that stretch from the pubic bone to the end of the backbone (coccyx) and from side to side.
Based on its relation to sacrum, coccyx's mobility has been categorized into four types: (i) rigid, when fused with the sacrum; (ii) normal, once there is flexion or extension within 5[degrees]-25[degrees] on dynamic radiography; (iii) hypermobile, when the range of movement exceeds 25[degrees]; and (iv) dislocated, when it is located posterior to the sacrum.
In effect what that meant was that the little one would be delivered with an unusual tumour at the base of her tailbone (coccyx).
A You could have a crack in your sacrum or coccyx. The pain down the back of your leg sounds like sciatica.
The majority of the PIs were located on the sacrum, ischium, coccyx, or heels and believed to be largely due to maintenance of supine positioning without turning within the evidence-based standard of every 2 hours (AHRQ, 2017).
"My younger sister, a senior who lives alone, had surgery about 12 years ago to remove her coccyx, and she has been in debilitating chronic pain since then.
Mr Burns said the victim suffered multiple injuries and bruising to his body, including his leg, back and coccyx. He said the incident has resulted in the victim having to give up his job as he's no longer able to operate machinery and is now on benefits.
But Miss Nevitt (pictured right) blamed morphine medication for the slurring and said she weaved in her wheelchair because of a problem with her coccyx.
A The pain you are describing sounds like it may be coccydynia: pain in the coccyx (tailbone) due to inflammation that may well be related to your accident.
(But not the anatomically correct rude ones); "We want your fuzzy mobile phone videos of gritters keeling over!"; "Tell us if you've slipped on a treacherous pavement and cracked your coccyx!"; "Here's how to do the Penguin Walk to prevent you slipping on a treacherous pavement and cracking your coccyx!" Every night we wonder how Derek the Weather and Lucy Owen are going to get home after their latenight snow bulletins while roving reporters are dispatched to dual carriageways littered with stranded cars.