vestibulocochlear nerve

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ves·tib·u·lo·coch·le·ar nerve

 (vĕ-stĭb′yə-lō-kŏk′lē-ər, -kō′klē-)
n.
Either of the eighth pair of cranial nerves, each of which divides to form the cochlear nerve and the vestibular nerve. Also called acoustic nerve, auditory nerve.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vestibulocochlear nerve

(vɛˌstɪbjʊːlə ˈkɒklɪə)
n
(Anatomy) either one of the eight pairs of cranial nerves that supply the cochlea and semicircular canals of the internal ear and contribute to the sense of hearing. Formerly called: acoustic nerve
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vestibulocochlear nerve - a composite sensory nerve supplying the hair cells of the vestibular organ and the hair cells of the cochlea
auditory system - the sensory system for hearing
cranial nerve - any of the 12 paired nerves that originate in the brain stem
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The MR showed that bilateral cochlear nerves cannot be identified well, considering a neurological maldevelopment, while there was no abnormality of the membranous labyrinth.
The CSA of the cochlear nerves (mean of both sides, 1.15 [mm.sup.2]) was larger than the CSA of the facial nerves (mean, 0.84 and 0.86 [mm.sup.2] in the right and left sides, respectively), a finding consistent with previous articles [6, 7].
* All IP-III cases have excellent cochlear nerves. Therefore, ABI is not indicated in this group of incomplete partitions.
(2009) observed eyelid ptosis, keratoconjunctivitis and different degrees of ataxia with morbidity and mortality rates ranging from 1.1 to 50% associated with paralysis of facial and vestibulo cochlear nerves due to intracranial space occupying lesions in feedlot cattle.
This surgical reference and atlas provides information on surgery for cochlear and other auditory implants, including auditory brain stem implants, active middle ear implants, and bone anchored hearing devices, as well as surgical situations like inner ear malformations, congenital absence of cochlear nerves, and implantation in neurofibromatosis II, the only hearing ear in solitary vestibular schwannomas, and the chronically discharging ear and cases with cerebrospinal fluid leaks.
Furthermore, the indications for ABI have also been expanded to other treatments, such as the treatments for nontumor patients, [sup][4],[11],[18],[19],[20],[21],[22],[23],[24],[25] ossification or major cochlear malformations, aplasia or avulsion of the cochlear nerves, vestibular schwannoma on the only hearing ears, and bilateral temporal bone fractures.
The facial and cochlear nerves also traverse the IAC.
Subsequent electrocochleography revealed intact cochlear nerves with the presence of microphonics and action potentials.
Auditory brainstem implant procedures are usually performed on adults with tumours in their cochlear nerves. In children, very few countries permit it.
Grayson was born without cochlear nerves, the "bridge" that carries auditory information from the inner ear to the brain.
These pertain to intraoperative monitoring of the facial and cochlear nerves, and consideration of implications for surgery and follow-up introduced by new devices such as cochlear and brainstem implants that allow deaf patients to regain hearing.
(4) Engagement of trigeminal nerves (manifesting as sensory deficit and neuralgia) and auditory and cochlear nerves (manifesting as vertigo) is far less common, obscuring the diagnosis of sarcoidosis.