cochlea

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coch·le·a

 (kŏk′lē-ə, kō′klē-ə)
n. pl. coch·le·ae (-lē-ē′, -lē-ī′) also coch·le·as
A spiral-shaped cavity of the inner ear that resembles a snail shell and contains nerve endings essential for hearing.

[Latin, snail shell, from Greek kokhliās, snail, from kokhlos, land snail.]

coch′le·ar adj.

cochlea

(ˈkɒklɪə)
n, pl -leae (-lɪˌiː)
(Anatomy) the spiral tube, shaped like a snail's shell, that forms part of the internal ear, converting sound vibrations into nerve impulses
[C16: from Latin: snail, spiral, from Greek kokhlias; probably related to Greek konkhē conch]
ˈcochlear adj

coch•le•a

(ˈkɒk li ə, ˈkoʊ kli ə)

n.
pl. coch•le•ae (ˈkɒk liˌi, -liˌaɪ, ˈkoʊ kliˌi, -kliˌaɪ)
coch•le•as.
the fluid-filled, spiral-shaped part of the inner ear in mammals.
[1530–40; < Latin < Greek kochlíās snail (with spiral shell), screw, probably akin to kónchē conch]
coch′le•ar, adj.

coch·le·a

(kŏk′lē-ə)
A spiral tube of the inner ear that looks like a snail shell and contains the nerve endings necessary for hearing.

cochlea

Part of the inner ear concerned with hearing: a canal coiled like a snail’s shell and linked to the acoustic nerve.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cochlea - the snail-shaped tube (in the inner ear coiled around the modiolus) where sound vibrations are converted into nerve impulses by the organ of Corticochlea - the snail-shaped tube (in the inner ear coiled around the modiolus) where sound vibrations are converted into nerve impulses by the organ of Corti
tube-shaped structure, tube - (anatomy) any hollow cylindrical body structure
basilar membrane - a membrane in the cochlea that supports the organ of Corti
inner ear, internal ear, labyrinth - a complex system of interconnecting cavities; concerned with hearing and equilibrium
modiolus - the central conical bony pillar of the cochlea
organ of Corti - the hearing organ of the inner ear; contains receptors that respond to sound waves
Translations
hlemýžď
simpukka

cochlea

[ˈkɒklɪə] N (cochleae (pl)) [ˈkɒklɪiː]cóclea f, caracol m óseo

cochlea

[ˈkɒkliə] nlimaçon m, cochlée f

cochlea

[ˈkɒklɪə] n (cochleae (pl)) [ˈkɒklɪˌiː] (Anat) → coclea

coch·lea

n. cóclea, parte del oído interno en forma de caracol.

cochlea

n (pl -leae) cóclea
References in periodicals archive ?
First, they increased the levels of Activin A in the cochleas of normal mice.
Beil, "Hair cell condition and auditory nerve response in normal and noise-damaged cochleas," Acta Oto-Laryngologica, vol.
On the examination of the corti organ surface in group 1, there were irregularities and partial losses in stereocilia of the outer hair cells of six cochleas (Figure 3).
However, it remains unclear whether these progenitor/stem cells can serve as a source for cell replacement therapy of injured cochleas.
Ossification of the basal turns of both cochleas was confirmed intraoperatively.
After noise exposure, the guinea pigs underwent auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold measurements, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected in their cochleas with electron spin resonance (ESR), and outer hair cells (OHCs) were counted with silvernitrate (AgNO [sub]3 ) staining at 1, 4, and 6 days.
The present paper describes a case of cochlear implantation after a bilateral temporal bone fracture causing bilateral profound hearing loss and ossification of one cochlea. A CT scan prior surgery showed patency of both cochleas.
Scientists thought coiled cochleas evolved as a way to pack a longer tube length into the available skull space, giving mammals better low-frequency hearing than other vertebrates, which lack cochleas.
Inflammation of the inner ear (labyrinthitis) was present in 44 percent of the unimplanted controls, 50 percent of the implanted ungrafted cochleas, and 6 percent of the implanted grafted (fascia and Gelfoam) cochleas.
Scientists managed to grow the hair cells vital to hearing in the cochleas of genetically modified mice.
Children are born with adult-sized cochleas; the inner ear is well formed by the end of the first trimester of pregnancy.
"Children are born with adult-size cochleas. There is some skull growth, but the inner ear doesn't change.