cockeyed


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

cock·eyed

 (kŏk′īd′)
adj. Informal
1. Foolish; ridiculous; absurd: a cockeyed idea.
2. Askew; crooked.
3. Intoxicated; drunk.

cockeyed

(ˈkɒkˌaɪd)
adj
1. (Pathology) afflicted with cross-eye, squint, or any other visible abnormality of the eyes
2. appearing to be physically or logically abnormal, absurd, etc; crooked; askew: cockeyed ideas.
3. drunk

cock•eyed

(ˈkɒkˌaɪd)

adj.
1. having a cockeye or cockeyes.
2. Slang.
a. off center; tilted or slanted to one side.
b. foolish; absurd.
c. intoxicated; drunk.
[1715–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cockeyed - turned or twisted toward one sidecockeyed - turned or twisted toward one side; "a...youth with a gorgeous red necktie all awry"- G.K.Chesterton; "his wig was, as the British say, skew-whiff"
crooked - having or marked by bends or angles; not straight or aligned; "crooked country roads"; "crooked teeth"
2.cockeyed - incongruous;inviting ridicule; "the absurd excuse that the dog ate his homework"; "that's a cockeyed idea"; "ask a nonsensical question and get a nonsensical answer"; "a contribution so small as to be laughable"; "it is ludicrous to call a cottage a mansion"; "a preposterous attempt to turn back the pages of history"; "her conceited assumption of universal interest in her rather dull children was ridiculous"
foolish - devoid of good sense or judgment; "foolish remarks"; "a foolish decision"
3.cockeyed - very drunkcockeyed - very drunk        
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
drunk, inebriated, intoxicated - stupefied or excited by a chemical substance (especially alcohol); "a noisy crowd of intoxicated sailors"; "helplessly inebriated"

cockeyed

adjective
1. absurd, crazy, ludicrous, preposterous, nonsensical She has some cockeyed delusions about becoming a big movie star.
2. (Informal) crooked, squint (informal), awry, lopsided, askew, asymmetrical, skewwhiff (Brit. informal) Dusty photographs were hanging at cockeyed angles on the walls.

cockeyed

adjective
2. Informal. Stupefied, excited, or muddled with alcoholic liquor:
Informal: stewed.
Idioms: drunk as a skunk, half-seas over, high as a kite, in one's cups, three sheets in the wind.
Translations

cockeyed

[ˈkɒkaɪd] ADJ
1. (= crooked) → torcido, chueco (LAm)
2. (= absurd) → disparatado

cockeyed

cock-eyed [ˌkɒkˈaɪd] adj
[idea, scheme] → saugrenu(e); [story] → qui ne tient pas debout
(= crooked) [object, smile] → de travers

cockeyed

[ˈkɒkˌaɪd] adj (crooked) → storto/a; (absurd) → assurdo/a, strampalato/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The ciders include: Snails Bank Rhubarb (Snails Bank Cider), Cockeyed Pear Mania (Cockeyed Cider) and Tempted Elderflower (Tempted Irish Cider).
Its cockeyed posture probably made it difficult for Philae to reliably get in touch with Rosetta, explaining why scientists had trouble reestablishing communication.
When you really have to decide, The thing to do is be aware That your emotions are cockeyed, Then make your best second guess at what's really there, And plump for the best side.
The Indiegogo page notes several times that the device has been patentedthis cockeyed Jewish legal dodge is proprietary and cannot be produced by others without the inventor's permission.
National Security Through a Cockeyed Lens is a pick for college-level political science collections and uses four decades of the author's psychological, historical and political science research to consider key problems in current leadership processes.
Textured blots of paint sharply translate into cockeyed looks, both the haunting gaze that begs you to join and the icy glare that assures you are not welcome.
For a nice video of revolvers with King cockeyed hammers see youtube.
Watchmen's cockeyed comic-book view of the Cold War in 1985 is something else again: Superman won the war in Vietnam, which is why Richard Nixon is still president.
rests cockeyed next to the other, not on either side of the head as
Professor David Nutt, the chairman of the Advisory Council, went so far as to make a cockeyed suggestion that popping the pills is far less dangerous than riding a horse.
Ragged, uneven and potholed with some dire dialogue and performances, the film's cockeyed optimism and likeable leads conspire to bring a smile by the time it's done," wrote Ray Bennett of movie publication the Hollywood Reporter.