cockroach


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cock·roach

 (kŏk′rōch′)
n.
Any of numerous insects of the order or suborder Blattaria, having oval flat bodies and laying eggs in hardened cases, and including several species that are common household pests.

[By folk etymology from obsolete cacarootch, from Spanish cucaracha, from cuca, caterpillar.]
Word History: The English word cockroach comes from the Spanish cucaracha. An early English form of cockroach is found in the writings of Captain John Smith, the English adventurer who helped found the British colony of Virginia in 1607. In a work first published in 1624, Smith describes the insects on the islands of Bermuda: "Musketas and Flies are also too busie, with a certaine India Bug, called by the Spaniards a Cacarootch, the which creeping into Chests they eat and defile with their ill-sented dung." Smith's spelling of the Spanish word was perhaps influenced by caca, the word for "excrement" in the baby-talk of many European languages, including Spanish and English. Later the form taken by the Spanish word cucaracha in English was influenced by another word, cock, "rooster," and the modern form cockroach was born. (This phenomenon, the alteration of a word resulting from a mistaken assumption about its meaning, is called folk etymology by linguists.) The Spanish word cucaracha has nothing to do with roosters, however. It is thought to be related to cuca, a word for a common kind of moth caterpillar in Spain.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cockroach

(ˈkɒkˌrəʊtʃ)
n
(Animals) any insect of the suborder Blattodea (or Blattaria), such as Blatta orientalis (oriental cockroach or black beetle): order Dictyoptera. They have an oval flattened body with long antennae and biting mouthparts and are common household pests. See also German cockroach, mantis
[C17: from Spanish cucaracha, of obscure origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cock•roach

(ˈkɒkˌroʊtʃ)

n.
any of numerous orthopterous insects of the family Blattidae, characterized by a flattened body, rapid movements, and usu. nocturnal habits and including several common household pests. Also called roach.
[1615–25; < Sp cucaracha, of uncertain orig., assimilated by folk etym. to cock1, roach2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cock·roach

(kŏk′rōch′)
Any of numerous brownish or black insects having a flat body and usually long antennae. Certain species are common household pests.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cockroach - any of numerous chiefly nocturnal insectscockroach - any of numerous chiefly nocturnal insects; some are domestic pests
dictyopterous insect - cockroaches and mantids
Blattaria, Blattodea, suborder Blattaria, suborder Blattodea - cockroaches; in some classifications considered an order
Asiatic cockroach, blackbeetle, Blatta orientalis, oriental cockroach, oriental roach - dark brown cockroach originally from orient now nearly cosmopolitan in distribution
American cockroach, Periplaneta americana - large reddish brown free-flying cockroach originally from southern United States but now widely distributed
Australian cockroach, Periplaneta australasiae - widely distributed in warm countries
Blattella germanica, Croton bug, crotonbug, German cockroach, water bug - small light-brown cockroach brought to United States from Europe; a common household pest
giant cockroach - large tropical American cockroaches
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
صَرْصورصَرْصُور
хлебарка
šváb
kakerlak
blato
torakka
žohar
csótánysvábbogár
kacoakecoak
kakkalakki
ゴキブリ
바퀴벌레
blatta
tarakonas
tarakāns
kakkerlaksissende kakkerlak
gândac
šváb
ščurek
kackerlacka
แมลงสาบ
hamam böceğihamamböceği
con gián

cockroach

[ˈkɒkrəʊtʃ] Ncucaracha f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cockroach

[ˈkɒkrəʊtʃ] ncafard m, cancrelat m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cockroach

nKüchenschabe f, → Kakerlak m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cockroach

[ˈkɒkˌrəʊtʃ] nscarafaggio, blatta
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cockroach

(ˈkokrəutʃ) noun
a beetle-like insect which is a household pest.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

cockroach

صَرْصُور šváb kakerlak Küchenschabe κατσαρίδα cucaracha torakka cafard žohar scarafaggio ゴキブリ 바퀴벌레 kakkerlak kakerlakk karaluch barata таракан kackerlacka แมลงสาบ hamam böceği con gián 蟑螂
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

cockroach

n. cucaracha.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cockroach

n cucaracha
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
And as for riding down that black, atrocious miscreant, I regard it as an act of virtue, sir, like stamping on a cockroach. This lad Hawkins is a trump, I perceive.
I remember me well, bein' under the same roof at the time on Florida, when a big tomcat chased a cockroach into the papers.
A hollow edifice erected for the habitation of man, rat, mouse, beelte, cockroach, fly, mosquito, flea, bacillus and microbe.
In Russia the small Asiatic cockroach has everywhere driven before it its great congener.
A cricket chirped from across the passage; someone was shouting and singing in the street; cockroaches rustled on the table, on the icons, and on the walls, and a big fly flopped at the head of the bed and around the candle beside him, the wick of which was charred and had shaped itself like a mushroom.
While listening to this whispering and feeling the sensation of this drawing out and the construction of this edifice of needles, he also saw by glimpses a red halo round the candle, and heard the rustle of the cockroaches and the buzzing of the fly that flopped against his pillow and his face.
The floor's mortal cold, and the damp sticks to the place like cockroaches to a collier.
One day, at Bahia, my attention was drawn by observing many spiders, cockroaches, and other insects, and some lizards, rushing in the greatest agitation across a bare piece of ground.
Oh, if you could see him killing cockroaches with a slipper!
With the exception of 2014, Foleshill has received the most calls every single year, so it wouldn't be unreasonable to say that this isn't entirely surprising, but it cements Foleshill as the cockroach capital of Coventry.
But while the total number of pest control call-outs to deal with cockroaches is fewer than the calls for bothratsandbedbugs, the number of cockroach incidents was higher than ever last year.
The researches placed cockroach traps in sewers, yards, and within the 40 New Orleans homes in the study.