codification

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cod·i·fy

 (kŏd′ĭ-fī′, kō′də-)
tr.v. cod·i·fied, cod·i·fy·ing, cod·i·fies
1. To organize or arrange systematically, especially in writing: "Arguments for the existence of God have been codified for centuries by theologians" (Richard Dawkins).
2. To establish or express in a conventional form or standard formulation: "The unification of motion and rest ... was proposed by Galileo and codified in Newton's first law of motion" (Lee Smolin).
3. To turn (a common law requirement or practice) into law.

cod′i·fi·ca′tion (-fĭ-kā′shən) n.
cod′i·fi′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

codification

(ˌkəʊdɪfɪˈkeɪʃən; ˌkɒ-)
n
1. the systematic organization of methods, rules, etc
2. (Law) law the collection into one body of the principles of a system of law
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cod•i•fi•ca•tion

(ˌkɒd ə fɪˈkeɪ ʃən, ˌkoʊ də-)

n.
the act, process, or result of arranging in a systematic form or code.
[1810–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

codification

The collection of a number of laws or legal principles into one organized body.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.codification - the act of codifying; arranging in a systematic order
systematisation, systematization, rationalisation, rationalization - systematic organization; the act of organizing something according to a system or a rationale
2.codification - a set of rules or principles or laws (especially written ones)
black and white, written communication, written language - communication by means of written symbols (either printed or handwritten)
Bushido - traditional code of the Japanese samurai which stressed courage and loyalty and self-discipline and simple living
legal code - a code of laws adopted by a state or nation; "a code of laws"
building code - set of standards established and enforced by local government for the structural safety of buildings
dress code - a set of rules specifying the correct manner of dress while on the premises of the institution (or specifying what manner of dress is prohibited)
fire code - set of standards established and enforced by government for fire prevention and safety in case of fire as in fire escapes etc
omerta - a code of silence practiced by the Mafia; a refusal to give evidence to the police about criminal activities
health code, sanitary code - set of standards established and enforced by government for health requirements as in plumbing etc
Highway Code - the code of rules governing the use of public roads
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
koodimine

codification

[ˌkəʊdɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] n [laws] → codification f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The evolution of international investment law illustrates how fragmented codifications can impede the development of a truly universal understanding of customary rules.
Codifications of the concept of "indirect expropriation" have similarly varied.
Such codifications were arguably also part of larger trends around constitutional change and modernizing the exercise of state power.
Macaulay and the Colonial Office successor models represented 'imposed' codifications, written by British imperial administrators involving little by way of indigenous input.
* the team of codifiers who had worked independently met to find common ground in comparing the codifications made
I speak of the church which used not to regard itself as a "confessional church" in which you must proclaim your acceptance of codifications rigidly drawn up.
Although different emphases guide subsequent chapters, this statement well summarizes Thorne's premise that the symbiotic relationship between vision and rhetoric bespeaks a European culture, with the discoveries and codifications of visual arts feeding into verbal ones.
The beginning of the codifications in Latin America
Thus, the French codification, which opens the way to codifications, is constantly and enthusiastically requested by the actors of political and social life.
"The codifications proposed in the bills are long overdue.
This Comment theorizes that provisions that guide interpreters' reading of codification information embody a "codifier's canon": an interpretive principle that judges should heed caption and placement in the Code where they reflect the choices of Congress, but not where they are introduced by nonlegislative codifiers.