coerce

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co·erce

 (kō-ûrs′)
tr.v. co·erced, co·erc·ing, co·erc·es
1. To pressure, intimidate, or force (someone) into doing something. See Synonyms at force.
2. To bring about or gain by pressure, threat, or force: coerced agreement among the parties; coerced a confession from the suspect.

[Latin coercēre, to control, restrain : co-, co- + arcēre, to enclose, confine.]

co·erc′er n.
co·erc′i·ble adj.

coerce

(kəʊˈɜːs)
vb
(tr) to compel or restrain by force or authority without regard to individual wishes or desires
[C17: from Latin coercēre to confine, restrain, from co- together + arcēre to enclose]
coˈercer n
coˈercible adj

co•erce

(koʊˈɜrs)

v.t. -erced, -erc•ing.
1. to compel by force or intimidation: to coerce someone into signing a document.
2. to bring about through force; exact: to coerce obedience.
3. to dominate or control, esp. by exploiting fear, anxiety, etc.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin coercēre to hold in, restrain <co- co- + arcēre to keep in, keep away, akin to arca ark]
co•erc′er, n.
co•er′ci•ble, adj.

coerce


Past participle: coerced
Gerund: coercing

Imperative
coerce
coerce
Present
I coerce
you coerce
he/she/it coerces
we coerce
you coerce
they coerce
Preterite
I coerced
you coerced
he/she/it coerced
we coerced
you coerced
they coerced
Present Continuous
I am coercing
you are coercing
he/she/it is coercing
we are coercing
you are coercing
they are coercing
Present Perfect
I have coerced
you have coerced
he/she/it has coerced
we have coerced
you have coerced
they have coerced
Past Continuous
I was coercing
you were coercing
he/she/it was coercing
we were coercing
you were coercing
they were coercing
Past Perfect
I had coerced
you had coerced
he/she/it had coerced
we had coerced
you had coerced
they had coerced
Future
I will coerce
you will coerce
he/she/it will coerce
we will coerce
you will coerce
they will coerce
Future Perfect
I will have coerced
you will have coerced
he/she/it will have coerced
we will have coerced
you will have coerced
they will have coerced
Future Continuous
I will be coercing
you will be coercing
he/she/it will be coercing
we will be coercing
you will be coercing
they will be coercing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been coercing
you have been coercing
he/she/it has been coercing
we have been coercing
you have been coercing
they have been coercing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been coercing
you will have been coercing
he/she/it will have been coercing
we will have been coercing
you will have been coercing
they will have been coercing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been coercing
you had been coercing
he/she/it had been coercing
we had been coercing
you had been coercing
they had been coercing
Conditional
I would coerce
you would coerce
he/she/it would coerce
we would coerce
you would coerce
they would coerce
Past Conditional
I would have coerced
you would have coerced
he/she/it would have coerced
we would have coerced
you would have coerced
they would have coerced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.coerce - to cause to do through pressure or necessity, by physical, moral or intellectual means :"She forced him to take a job in the city"; "He squeezed her for information"
turn up the heat, turn up the pressure - apply great or increased pressure; "The Democrats turned up the heat on their candidate to concede the election"
drive - to compel or force or urge relentlessly or exert coercive pressure on, or motivate strongly; "She is driven by her passion"
bludgeon - overcome or coerce as if by using a heavy club; "The teacher bludgeoned the students into learning the math formulas"
steamroll, steamroller - bring to a specified state by overwhelming force or pressure; "The Senator steamrollered the bill to defeat"
squeeze for - squeeze someone for money, information, etc.
dragoon, railroad, sandbag - compel by coercion, threats, or crude means; "They sandbagged him to make dinner for everyone"
terrorise, terrorize - coerce by violence or with threats
compel, obligate, oblige - force somebody to do something; "We compel all students to fill out this form"
bring oneself - cause to undertake a certain action, usually used in the negative; "He could not bring himself to call his parents"

coerce

verb force, compel, bully, intimidate, railroad (informal), constrain, bulldoze (informal), dragoon, pressurize, browbeat, press-gang, twist (someone's) arm (informal), drive He argued that the government had coerced him into resigning.

coerce

verb
1. To compel by pressure or threats:
Informal: hijack, strong-arm.
2. To cause (a person or thing) to act or move in spite of resistance:
Translations
يُرغِم، يُكرِه
nutit
tvinge
òvinga
prievarta
piespiest

coerce

[kəʊˈɜːs] VTobligar, coaccionar
to coerce sb into doing sthobligar a algn a hacer algo, coaccionar a algn para que haga algo

coerce

[kəʊˈɜːrs] vt
to coerce sb into doing sth → forcer qn à faire qch

coerce

vtzwingen; to coerce somebody into doing somethingjdn dazu zwingen or nötigen (geh), → etw zu tun

coerce

[kəʊˈɜːs] vt to coerce sb (into doing sth)costringere qn (a fare qc)

coerce

(kəuˈəːs) verb
to force (a person into doing something).
coˈercion (-ʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
This penalty, whatever it may be, can only be inflicted in two ways: by the agency of the courts and ministers of justice, or by military force; by the COERCION of the magistracy, or by the COERCION of arms.
It is pleasant to know that a new ministry just come into office are not the only fellow-men who enjoy a period of high appreciation and full-blown eulogy; in many respectable families throughout this realm, relatives becoming creditable meet with a similar cordiality of recognition, which in its fine freedom from the coercion of any antecedents, suggests the hopeful possibility that we may some day without any notice find ourselves in full millennium, with cockatrices who have ceased to bite, and wolves that no longer show their teeth with any but the blandest intentions.
There is a terrible coercion in our deeds, which may first turn the honest man into a deceiver and then reconcile him to the change, for this reason--that the second wrong presents itself to him in the guise of the only practicable right.
In the submissive way of one long accustomed to obey under coercion, he ate and drank what they gave him to eat and drink, and put on the cloak and other wrappings, that they gave him to wear.
I had known, from the time when I could speak, that my sister, in her capricious and violent coercion, was unjust to me.
The intensity of her religious disposition, the coercion it exercised over her life, was but one aspect of a nature altogether ardent, theoretic, and intellectually consequent: and with such a nature struggling in the bands of a narrow teaching, hemmed in by a social life which seemed nothing but a labyrinth of petty courses, a walled-in maze of small paths that led no whither, the outcome was sure to strike others as at once exaggeration and inconsistency.
I overcame the extreme reluctance of the natives--a reluctance which extends even to talk upon the subject--and by judicious persuasion and gifts, aided, I will admit, by some threats of coercion, I got two of them to act as guides.
I will not have it cast in my teeth, at some future day, that Madame Fosco acted under my coercion, and was, in plain fact, no witness at all.