coesite


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coesite

(ˈkəʊsaɪt)
n
(Minerals) a form of silicon dioxide produced when high pressure and temperature are applied to quartz
References in periodicals archive ?
2004, Discovery of coesite from Indus suture zone (ISZ), Ladakh, India: Evidence for deep subduction.
Coesite discoveries establish cryptovolcanics as fossil meteorite craters.
MUESTRAS CARANCAS M1 M2 M3 Fases Olivino [75-1556] [80-940] Troilita [75-2165] Pyroxeno [80-276] [86-741] Ringwoodite [74-1681] Quartz [79-1913] [82-511] [85-794] Albite [89-6423] [83-1606] [84-752] Illite [26-911] [26-911] Montmorillonite [13-135] [13-135] Hematite [88-2359] [85-599] Jadeite [80-1869] [3-635] Coesite [83-1831] Stishovite [89-3436] Muscovite [34.
Its atoms aggregate in forms as common as quartz crystals and as exotic as coesite and stishovite, minerals formed by the intense pressures generated when extraterrestrial objects such as comets and asteroids strike Earth's surface (SN: 6/15/02, p.
Coesite and stishovite were discovered in the Barringer Meteor Crater and the Ries Crater, in Germany, more than a decade before the Alvarez group advanced the theory about the K-T extinction.
A less common form is known as coesite, which has been found in meteorite impact craters such as Meteor Crater, Arizona.
Its impact origin was confirmed with the discovery of shatter cones (Dietz 1960), shocked quartz (Carlton and others 1998; Koeberl and others 1998), and coesite (Cohen and others 1961) and is supported by the enrichment of siderophile elements at the center of the structure (Carlton and others 1998; Koeberland others 1998).
The pyrope crystals are rich in interesting inclusions such as coesite (the monoclinic polymorph of quartz which formed at depths of some 100 km), two species for which this is the type locality (ellenbergerite, and magnesiodumortierite), and also bearthite, phosphoellenbergerite, zircon and monazite-(Ce).