coevolution


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Related to coevolution: antagonistic coevolution

co·ev·o·lu·tion

 (kō′ĕv-ə-lo͞o′shən, -ē-və-)
n.
The process by which two or more interacting species evolve together, each changing as a result of changes in the other or others. It occurs, for example, between predators and prey and between insects and the flowers that they pollinate.

co′ev·o·lu′tion·ar·y adj.
co′e·volve′ (-ĭ-vŏlv′) v.

coevolution

(kəʊˌiːvəˈluːʃən)
n
(Biology) the evolution of complementary adaptations in two or more species of organisms because of a special relationship that exists between them, as in insect-pollinated plants and their insect pollinators

co•ev•o•lu•tion

(ˌkoʊ ɛv əˈlu ʃən; esp. Brit. -i və-)

n.
evolution involving a series of reciprocal changes in two or more noninterbreeding populations that have a close ecological relationship and act as agents of natural selection for each other, as the adaptations of a predator for pursuing and of its prey for fleeing.
[1960–65]

co·ev·o·lu·tion

(kō′ĕv-ə-lo͞o′shən)
The evolution of two or more species that are dependent on one another, with each species adapting to changes in the other. The development of flowering plants and insects such as bees and butterflies that pollinate them is an example of coevolution.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As compelling as is the specific narrative about the coevolution of categories of religion, faith, and sexuality in the Atlantic world, the book's biggest contribution may be in the imaginative way Kopelson deploys archival resources to tell stories the archives themselves resist and conceal.
Coevolution of markers of innate and adaptive immunity in skin and peripheral blood of patients with erythema migrans.
Influenced by our ever-changing environment, ever-increasing toxic burden, and subsequent epigenetic mutations (epimutations), our coevolution with these creatures is an ever-changing phenomenon which is most certainly contributing to our human fate.
Thus, I will develop methods that leverage coevolution to automatically discover the best events, instead of sampling them randomly.
The relationship between the predator and the prey is important to the study of their coevolution (Chi & Yang 2003).
The research indicates that "the fine-tuning of coevolution between plants and pollinators may be greater than we imagined," says ecologist Ethan Temeles of Amherst College in Massachusetts.
Smith maintains an evolutionary framework for understanding the emergence of ecologically rational systems: "But in cultural and biological coevolution, order arises from mechanisms for generating variation to which is applied mechanisms for selection.
The existence of such black holes when the universe was less than one billion years old presents substantial challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes and the coevolution of black holes and galaxies," they said.
Writings include "The Evolution of Sexually Antagonistic Phenotypes", "Sexual Conflict, Life Span, and Aging", "Sex Chromosome Drive", "Infanticide as Sexual Conflict: Coevolution of Male Strategies and Female Counterstrategies", "Is Sexual Conflict an 'Engine of Speciation'?
Materials are the focus of Part II, exposing how matter has its own influence on human behavior rather than merely being used, and engaging such ideas as skeuomorphy, mimesis, and coevolution.
The coevolution of software and new hardware form factors will intermediate and digitize - many of the things we do and experience in business, life and our world," he said.