coevolution


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Related to coevolution: antagonistic coevolution

co·ev·o·lu·tion

 (kō′ĕv-ə-lo͞o′shən, -ē-və-)
n.
The process by which two or more interacting species evolve together, each changing as a result of changes in the other or others. It occurs, for example, between predators and prey and between insects and the flowers that they pollinate.

co′ev·o·lu′tion·ar·y adj.
co′e·volve′ (-ĭ-vŏlv′) v.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

coevolution

(kəʊˌiːvəˈluːʃən)
n
(Biology) the evolution of complementary adaptations in two or more species of organisms because of a special relationship that exists between them, as in insect-pollinated plants and their insect pollinators
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

co•ev•o•lu•tion

(ˌkoʊ ɛv əˈlu ʃən; esp. Brit. -i və-)

n.
evolution involving a series of reciprocal changes in two or more noninterbreeding populations that have a close ecological relationship and act as agents of natural selection for each other, as the adaptations of a predator for pursuing and of its prey for fleeing.
[1960–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·ev·o·lu·tion

(kō′ĕv-ə-lo͞o′shən)
The evolution of two or more species that are dependent on one another, with each species adapting to changes in the other. The development of flowering plants and insects such as bees and butterflies that pollinate them is an example of coevolution.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of A Good Society, Nicholas Christakis argues that this coevolution has equipped us with a "social suite" of traits that arose through genetic evolution and that have been amplified by cultural evolution, which has in turn influenced our genetic evolution toward propensities that support the social suite.
"We think," says senior study author Christopher Lowry, an associate professor of integrative physiology at CU Boulder, "[that] there is a special sauce driving the protective effects in this bacterium, and this fat is one of the main ingredients in that special sauce." He says that the finding is "a huge step forward for us because it identifies an active component of the bacteri[um] and the receptor for this active component in the host." The interaction between the anti-inflammatory fatty acid and immune cells is a product of the coevolution of humans and soil bacteria, Lowry argues.
In a (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jcpp.12765?systemMessage=Wiley+Online+Library+will+be+down+on+Wednesday+05th+July+starting+at+17.00+EDT+%2F+22%3A00+BST+%2F+02%3A30+IST+%2F+05.00+SGT+%286th+July%29+for+up+to+1+hour+due+to+essential+maintenance+&) related study titled "Cannabis use and psychoticalike experiences trajectories during early adolescence: the coevolution and potential mediators", which observed 2,566 teens aged 13 to 16 years also over a four-year period, researchers found that psychotic-like experiences (PLE) had a higher incidence in teens who used marijuana.
10: Anurag Agrawal's "Monarchs and Milkweed: A Migrating Butterfly, a Poisonous Plant, and Their Remarkable Story of Coevolution," 2017.
'Millions of years of coevolution made parasites the trackers of the host's evolution history.
Our long coevolution with disease has 'wired in' this intuitive sense of what can cause infection."
In a networked world, where everything we do affects others, we must learn to think beyond ourselves, and pursue cooperation, cocreation, coevolution, and collective intelligence.
Among specific topics are the poentializing function of language (Guillaume), the triadic logic of the sign (Peirce), abduction as a poietic procedure, and the coevolution of language and the brain.
Sacks points out that Darwin illuminated for the first time the coevolution of plants and insects.
Concerning measurement, or how company performance is evaluated, this varies between the production of random data on unknown behavior patterns (Level 1) to monitoring company patterns and coevolution with the environment (Level 5).
This genetic-cultural coevolution explains why many of us with pastoralist ancestors are lactose tolerant.