cognition


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cog·ni·tion

 (kŏg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The mental process of knowing, including aspects such as awareness, perception, reasoning, and judgment.
2. That which comes to be known, as through perception, reasoning, or intuition; knowledge.

[Middle English cognicioun, from Latin cognitiō, cognitiōn-, from cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn : co-, intensive pref.; see co- + gnōscere, to know; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·ni′tion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cognition

(kɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
1. (Psychology) the mental act or process by which knowledge is acquired, including perception, intuition, and reasoning
2. the knowledge that results from such an act or process
[C15: from Latin cognitiō, from cognōscere from co- (intensive) + nōscere to learn; see know]
cogˈnitional adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cog•ni•tion

(kɒgˈnɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act or process of knowing; perception.
2. something known or perceived.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin cognitiō <cogni-, variant s. of cognōscere to get to know (co- co- + (g)nōscere to get to know) + -tiō -tion]
cog•ni′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoningcognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
mind, psyche, nous, brain, head - that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn't get his words out of my head"
place - an abstract mental location; "he has a special place in my thoughts"; "a place in my heart"; "a political system with no place for the less prominent groups"
general knowledge, public knowledge - knowledge that is available to anyone
episteme - the body of ideas that determine the knowledge that is intellectually certain at any particular time
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
inability - lack of ability (especially mental ability) to do something
lexis - all of the words in a language; all word forms having meaning or grammatical function
lexicon, mental lexicon, vocabulary - a language user's knowledge of words
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
cognitive factor - something immaterial (as a circumstance or influence) that contributes to producing a result
equivalent - a person or thing equal to another in value or measure or force or effect or significance etc; "send two dollars or the equivalent in stamps"
cognitive operation, cognitive process, mental process, process, operation - (psychology) the performance of some composite cognitive activity; an operation that affects mental contents; "the process of thinking"; "the cognitive operation of remembering"
unconscious process, process - a mental process that you are not directly aware of; "the process of denial"
perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"
structure - the complex composition of knowledge as elements and their combinations; "his lectures have no structure"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
history - all that is remembered of the past as preserved in writing; a body of knowledge; "the dawn of recorded history"; "from the beginning of history"
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cognition

noun (Formal) perception, reasoning, understanding, intelligence, awareness, insight, comprehension, apprehension, discernment processes of perception and cognition
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

cognition

[kɒgˈnɪʃən] Ncognición f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cognition

nErkenntnis f; (visual) → Wahrnehmung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cognition

[ˌkɒgˈnɪʃn] n (frm) → apprendimento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cog·ni·tion

n. cognición, conocimiento, acción y efecto de conocer.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
(I am speaking within the circle of conventional doctrines, not expressing my own beliefs.) This direction towards an object is commonly regarded as typical of every form of cognition, and sometimes of mental life altogether.
(Alliance News) - Cambridge Cognition Holdings PLC said Monday it has expanded further into the Chinese market, with the introduction of its Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery assessments.
An instructor can persuade the pupils to share their improvements, their thoughts for activity, their cognition in the course of that learning process.
How the Body Shapes Knowledge: Empirical Support for Embodied Cognition
Objective: To determine the association between physical activity and cognition in age-related decline of college students and to find the correlation between physical activity with cardiovascular deconditioning.
[USA], Nov 28 (ANI): Stigma related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) impairs cognition in men living with the condition, finds a study.
In addition, children also completed a cognition test, which assessed language abilities, episodic memory, executive function, attention, working memory and processing speed.
Notably, early MCI significantly predicted dementia even if patients reverted to normal cognition with dopaminergic treatment, as reported by the Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders at Stavanger (Norway) University Hospital.
Bhattoji Diksita and his nephew Kaundabhatta respond to the views expressed by Naiyayikas and Mimarhsakas by reformulating the association of speech forms with semantic conditions stated by the tradition of Paninian grammar in terms of cognition. The discussions of these three disciplines in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries constitute a sophisticated cognitive science concerned with the structure of verbal cognition, the cognition that arises from understanding speech.
Imagination, Meditation, and Cognition in the Middle Ages
However, it is less known that obesity is related to our thinking skills (cognition), and even future risk for dementia.