cognition

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cog·ni·tion

 (kŏg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The mental process of knowing, including aspects such as awareness, perception, reasoning, and judgment.
2. That which comes to be known, as through perception, reasoning, or intuition; knowledge.

[Middle English cognicioun, from Latin cognitiō, cognitiōn-, from cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn : co-, intensive pref.; see co- + gnōscere, to know; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·ni′tion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cognition

(kɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
1. (Psychology) the mental act or process by which knowledge is acquired, including perception, intuition, and reasoning
2. the knowledge that results from such an act or process
[C15: from Latin cognitiō, from cognōscere from co- (intensive) + nōscere to learn; see know]
cogˈnitional adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cog•ni•tion

(kɒgˈnɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act or process of knowing; perception.
2. something known or perceived.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin cognitiō <cogni-, variant s. of cognōscere to get to know (co- co- + (g)nōscere to get to know) + -tiō -tion]
cog•ni′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoningcognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
mind, psyche, nous, brain, head - that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn't get his words out of my head"
place - an abstract mental location; "he has a special place in my thoughts"; "a place in my heart"; "a political system with no place for the less prominent groups"
general knowledge, public knowledge - knowledge that is available to anyone
episteme - the body of ideas that determine the knowledge that is intellectually certain at any particular time
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
inability - lack of ability (especially mental ability) to do something
lexis - all of the words in a language; all word forms having meaning or grammatical function
lexicon, mental lexicon, vocabulary - a language user's knowledge of words
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
cognitive factor - something immaterial (as a circumstance or influence) that contributes to producing a result
equivalent - a person or thing equal to another in value or measure or force or effect or significance etc; "send two dollars or the equivalent in stamps"
cognitive operation, cognitive process, mental process, process, operation - (psychology) the performance of some composite cognitive activity; an operation that affects mental contents; "the process of thinking"; "the cognitive operation of remembering"
unconscious process, process - a mental process that you are not directly aware of; "the process of denial"
perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"
structure - the complex composition of knowledge as elements and their combinations; "his lectures have no structure"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
history - all that is remembered of the past as preserved in writing; a body of knowledge; "the dawn of recorded history"; "from the beginning of history"
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cognition

noun (Formal) perception, reasoning, understanding, intelligence, awareness, insight, comprehension, apprehension, discernment processes of perception and cognition
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

cognition

[kɒgˈnɪʃən] Ncognición f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cognition

nErkenntnis f; (visual) → Wahrnehmung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cognition

[ˌkɒgˈnɪʃn] n (frm) → apprendimento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cog·ni·tion

n. cognición, conocimiento, acción y efecto de conocer.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas does precisely what Adler says he does: seeks to establish only the immateriality of the cognitional intentional order.
If the default sense of phantasm is visual, and there is no seeing (no in-sight) into one's intellectual operations (neither any acoustic, tactile, or other sensible phantasm), perhaps the closest image is a kinetic phantasm, that is, the familiar rising through the sequential levels of cognitional structure from experience up through understanding to judgment--the successive progression of cognitional operations as movement through "interior space-time." So we have insight by proxy, by naming the linked set of symbols, which is a verbal solution.
As a pilgrim (viator), however, he elicited those natural and supernatural cognitional acts that constituted his human and historical life.
The answers to these prior and more basic (2) cognitional questions can be established in and through a careful study and articulation of human understanding and can serve the function of critically grounding (3) an evaluative history of ideas.
In this third chapter, Lonergan's method of deriving the metaphysical elements from the elements brought to light in cognitional theory is briefly compared and contrasted with the methodologies inherent in approaches of philosophers such as W.V.O.
And so Benedict in his address to the Roman Curia speaks of "doctrine, pure and integral, without any attenuation or distortion"; "adherence to all the teaching of the Church in its entirety and preciseness"; and "faithful and perfect conformity to the authentic doctrine." (95) What is significant here is the emphasis placed on the cognitional function of meaning (true doctrine).
Direct cognition of individual things grants immediate, indirect, concomitant awareness of cognitional activity and attainment of universality "in things themselves" that is reflectively refined within science(s) and philosophy, and which intimates the human desire for essential being and eudaimonia (pp.
JOEL NIMITZ STEINMETZ, "Cognitional Arguments for the Immateriality of Mind." Adviser: Michael Gorman.
"The first is a poverty not of educational theory, but more foundationally of cognitional theory.
Mansueto's resolution of this bi-polar critique of knowledge is a full fledged cognitional theory and epistemology which will provide the rational basis for a metaphysics, ethics, and theology.
While I have pointed to certain differences between them on other issues, I have made no attempt to address their fundamental commitments on such questions as cognitional theory and epistemology, the theological significance of the notion of nature, and so on, where the differences may well be far more profound than the complementarity that I am here signaling might suggest.
In chapter 6 Gerson's discussion of the Timaeus is notable for arguing that the demiurgos is Plato's paradigm of a disembodied thinker: "I have been arguing throughout this book that knowledge is a state in which there is cognitional identity between knower and known.

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