cognition

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Related to cognitions: Cognitive processing

cog·ni·tion

 (kŏg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The mental process of knowing, including aspects such as awareness, perception, reasoning, and judgment.
2. That which comes to be known, as through perception, reasoning, or intuition; knowledge.

[Middle English cognicioun, from Latin cognitiō, cognitiōn-, from cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn : co-, intensive pref.; see co- + gnōscere, to know; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·ni′tion·al adj.

cognition

(kɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
1. (Psychology) the mental act or process by which knowledge is acquired, including perception, intuition, and reasoning
2. the knowledge that results from such an act or process
[C15: from Latin cognitiō, from cognōscere from co- (intensive) + nōscere to learn; see know]
cogˈnitional adj

cog•ni•tion

(kɒgˈnɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act or process of knowing; perception.
2. something known or perceived.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin cognitiō <cogni-, variant s. of cognōscere to get to know (co- co- + (g)nōscere to get to know) + -tiō -tion]
cog•ni′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoningcognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
mind, psyche, nous, brain, head - that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn't get his words out of my head"
place - an abstract mental location; "he has a special place in my thoughts"; "a place in my heart"; "a political system with no place for the less prominent groups"
general knowledge, public knowledge - knowledge that is available to anyone
episteme - the body of ideas that determine the knowledge that is intellectually certain at any particular time
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
inability - lack of ability (especially mental ability) to do something
lexis - all of the words in a language; all word forms having meaning or grammatical function
lexicon, mental lexicon, vocabulary - a language user's knowledge of words
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
cognitive factor - something immaterial (as a circumstance or influence) that contributes to producing a result
equivalent - a person or thing equal to another in value or measure or force or effect or significance etc; "send two dollars or the equivalent in stamps"
cognitive operation, cognitive process, mental process, process, operation - (psychology) the performance of some composite cognitive activity; an operation that affects mental contents; "the process of thinking"; "the cognitive operation of remembering"
unconscious process, process - a mental process that you are not directly aware of; "the process of denial"
perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"
structure - the complex composition of knowledge as elements and their combinations; "his lectures have no structure"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
history - all that is remembered of the past as preserved in writing; a body of knowledge; "the dawn of recorded history"; "from the beginning of history"
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"

cognition

noun (Formal) perception, reasoning, understanding, intelligence, awareness, insight, comprehension, apprehension, discernment processes of perception and cognition
Translations

cognition

[kɒgˈnɪʃən] Ncognición f

cognition

nErkenntnis f; (visual) → Wahrnehmung f

cognition

[ˌkɒgˈnɪʃn] n (frm) → apprendimento

cog·ni·tion

n. cognición, conocimiento, acción y efecto de conocer.
References in classic literature ?
(I am speaking within the circle of conventional doctrines, not expressing my own beliefs.) This direction towards an object is commonly regarded as typical of every form of cognition, and sometimes of mental life altogether.
"Pain neuroscience education combined with cognition-targeted motor control training appears to be more effective than current best-evidence physical therapy for improving pain, symptoms of central sensitization, disability, mental and physical functioning, and pain cognitions in individuals with chronic spinal pain," the authors write.
He discusses theory of mind and situated cognition to evaluate Iago's overmentalizing; cognitive behavioral therapy and Stoic philosophy to understand Iago and his masochism, arguing that masochism allows Iago to negate his hyperattunment to others and permits release; Iago in terms of the neural sublime, or the cognitive unconscious; and Othello's cognitions and mindblindness.
Most conceptual definitions and measures of sexual cognitions (often referred to as fantasies) assume that they are pleasant, enjoyable, and deliberate (Leitenberg & Henning, 1995).
This study investigated the effect of exposure to television food advertising on accessibility of food-related cognitions and motivation to eat.
An example of the first is all communicating sounds, of the second all cognitions, and of the third everyone's conventional 'I'.
Substitute for apology: Manipulation of cognitions to reduce negative attitude toward self.
209-55) Watson translates and explains Ramakantha's attempt to show that the Buddhists' acceptance of self-illuminating cognition commits them to the existence of a self that is a permanent and unchanging consciousness that "shines forth" in all cognitions.
of Leeds, UK) offers an account of the body of research that exists in this domain so far, particularly work on the cognitions of pre-service and practicing teachers in teaching grammar, reading, and writing.
We should start by identifying cognitions, such as job description, scope, dimension, growth opportunities, reputation of the company or any other factors about the job offer.
In developing the fundamental conceptual cornerstones upon which central questions in entrepreneurial cognition research is based, we develop our explanation beginning with the more general and proceeding to the more specific: from articulating a foundation/general definition of cognitions toward our setting within this background, the definition of entrepreneurial cognitions that we have previously offered (please see Mitchell, Busenitz et al., 2002).

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