cognomen

(redirected from cognomina)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

cog·no·men

 (kŏg-nō′mən)
n. pl. cog·no·mens or cog·nom·i·na (-nŏm′ə-nə)
1.
a. A family name; a surname.
b. The third and usually last name of a citizen of ancient Rome, as Caesar in Gaius Julius Caesar.
2. A name, especially a descriptive nickname or epithet acquired through usage over a period of time.

[Latin cognōmen : co-, con-, co- (influenced by cognōscere, to know) + nōmen, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·nom′i·nal (-nŏm′ə-nəl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cognomen

(kɒɡˈnəʊmɛn)
n, pl -nomens or -nomina (-ˈnɒmɪnə; -ˈnəʊ-)
(Historical Terms) (originally) an ancient Roman's third name or nickname, which later became his family name. See also agnomen, nomen, praenomen
[C19: from Latin: additional name, from co- together + nōmen name; influenced in form by cognōscere to learn]
cognominal adj
cogˈnominally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cog•no•men

(kɒgˈnoʊ mən)

n., pl. -no•mens, -nom•i•na (-ˈnɒm ə nə)
1. any name, esp. a nickname or epithet.
2. the third and commonly the last name of a citizen of ancient Rome, indicating the person's house or family, as “Caesar” in “Gaius Julius Caesar.” Compare agnomen (def. 1).
3. a surname.
[1800–10; < Latin, =co- co- + nōmen name]
cog•nom′i•nal (-ˈnɒm ə nəl, -ˈnoʊ mə-) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cognomen

1. Ancient Rome. the third and usually last name in Roman personal names, as Caesar of Gaius Julius Caesar.
2. a surname or family name.
3. a nickname. — cognominal. adj.
See also: Names
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognomen - a familiar name for a person (often a shortened version of a person's given name)cognomen - a familiar name for a person (often a shortened version of a person's given name); "Joe's mother would not use his nickname and always called him Joseph"; "Henry's nickname was Slim"
appellation, appellative, designation, denomination - identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from others
2.cognomen - the name used to identify the members of a family (as distinguished from each member's given name)
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
maiden name - a woman's surname before marriage
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cognomen

noun
The word or words by which one is called and identified:
Slang: handle, moniker.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

cognomen

[kɒgˈnəʊmen] N (frm) (cognomens or cognomina (pl)) (= surname) → apellido m; (= nickname) → apodo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Eric Maikranz's novel 'The Reincarnationist Papers', which focuses on the Cognomina, a secret society of people who possess total recall of their past lives.
First, the migratory transferred names, which in turn can be divided into two groups: the names given by migrants and the toponyms that have emerged from cognomina given to migrants.
John Lee Hancock and Ian Shorr are adapting D Eric Maikranz's novel 'The Reincarnationist Paper', which follows the Cognomina, a secret society of people who possess total recall of their past lives.
Teniendo en cuenta la morfologia, las dimensiones de la pizarra y los posibles cognomina con los que se han podido establecer paralelos podemos argumentar que lo mas previsible es que el texto formara parte de un epigrafe funerario en el que unicamente podemos distinguir parte del nombre del difunto (4), sin que se haga mencion a la filiacion o a la edad del fallecido.
Antonius Creticus and the cognomina ex victis gentibus', ZPE 80 (1990) 157-64.