cognoscenti


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co·gno·scen·te

 (kŏn′yə-shĕn′tē, kŏg′nə-)
n. pl. co·gno·scen·ti (-tē)
A person with superior, usually specialized knowledge or highly refined taste; a connoisseur.

[Obsolete Italian, from Latin cognōscēns, cognōscent-, present participle of cognōscere, to know; see cognition.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cognoscenti

(ˌkɒnjəʊˈʃɛntɪ; ˌkɒɡnəʊ-) or

conoscenti

pl n, sing -te (-tiː)
1. (Art Terms) (sometimes singular) people with informed appreciation of a particular field, esp in the fine arts; connoisseurs
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (sometimes singular) people with informed appreciation of a particular field, esp in the fine arts; connoisseurs
[C18: from obsolete Italian (modern conoscente), from Latin cognōscere to know, learn about]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

co•gno•scen•ti

(ˌkɒn yəˈʃɛn ti, ˌkɒg nə-)

n.pl., sing. -te (-teɪ, -ti)
well-informed persons, esp. those who have superior knowledge of a particular field, as in the arts.
[1770–80; < Italian, Latinized variant of conoscente, present participle of conoscere to know < Latin. See cognition, -ent]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cognoscenti

An Italian word meaning those who know, used to mean connoisseurs.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Translations

cognoscenti

[ˌkɒnəʊˈʃentɪ] NPLexpertos mpl, peritos mpl
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cognoscenti

[ˌkɒgnəˈʃɛnti] npl (= connoisseurs) → spécialistes mfpl
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cognoscenti

[ˌkɒnjəʊˈʃɛntɪ] npl the cognoscenti (frm) → gli esperti
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Such at least I have gathered to be the opinion of cognoscenti."
He is the nearest thing to Frankel among the cognoscenti at Ripon, a specialists' track the undulations of which can catch out the unwary and the unbalanced.
The Lehman Trilogy is the hottest play in townrequired viewing for the financial and theatrically minded cognoscenti, the new Hamilton for wealthy New York hipsters.
Throughout Shirinov's mellifluous extemporizations and pianistic pyrotechnics entranced the jazz cognoscenti in the crowd, particularly in his variations around the folksong Gul Achdi.
Ben Stiller's sequel is festooned with cameos from the fashion cognoscenti, including American Vogue's editor-in-chief Anna Wintour and designers Tommy Hilfiger, Marc Jacobs, Valentino and Alexander Wang.
ArtBahrain will be a meltA[degrees] ing pot of artists, gallerists, cognoscenti and art lovers.
But the cognoscenti know just how far this judgement falls short.
According to News.com.au, on Tuesday, Australian cricket's cognoscenti witnessed the birth of the National Cricket Centre, a 29 million-dollar facility in Brisbane that will serve as a Mecca for the nation's finest prospects.
Pushelberg added: "When people are there, whether they're in the design cognoscenti or someone's mother, they see the lockers and get it.''
Result is a spiky, smartly packaged commercial enterprise as sure to score with mainstream audiences as it is to irk the cognoscenti.
In sum, we and future generations must continue to press for more democracy in the church, more participation by all her constituents, less control by presumed cognoscenti, and not be put off by stock phrases to the contrary.
(https://twitter.com/curtwoodward) Curt Atwood wrote a piece at Cognoscenti, (http://cognoscenti.wbur.org/2013/04/24/boston-marathon-bombing-lessons-learned-curt-woodward) arguing strongly that using a scanner traffic for journalism is a terrible idea :