cohabitation


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co·hab·it

 (kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. co·hab·it·ed, co·hab·it·ing, co·hab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

[Late Latin cohabitāre : Latin co-, co- + Latin habitāre, to dwell; see inhabit.]

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.

cohabitation

(kəʊˌhæbɪˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Sociology) the state or condition of living together in a conjugal relationship without being married
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (of political parties) the state or condition of cooperating for specific purposes without forming a coalition
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cohabitation - the act of living together and having a sexual relationship (especially without being married)cohabitation - the act of living together and having a sexual relationship (especially without being married)
inhabitancy, inhabitation, habitation - the act of dwelling in or living permanently in a place (said of both animals and men); "he studied the creation and inhabitation and demise of the colony"
concubinage - cohabitation without being legally married
Translations
avoliitto

cohabitation

[ˌkəʊhæbɪˈteɪʃən] Ncohabitación f

cohabitation

[kəʊˌhæbɪˈteɪʃən] nconcubinage m, vie f maritale

cohabitation

References in classic literature ?
It is equally unnecessary to state to what a degree that whole cathedral was familiar to him, after so long and so intimate a cohabitation.
No form or ceremony, civil or religious; no notice before, or publication after; no cohabitation, no writing, no witnesses even, are essential to the constitution of this, the most important contract which two persons can enter into.
This is asserted by the fact that according to the international surveys, child-rearing in cohabitation unions is no longer a rarity (Bumpass and Lu 2000, Kiernan 2002, Seltzer 2000, Smock 2000).
He added: "In some cases the fact of cohabitation will weigh heavily in the scales; in others, it will not.
Organized topically, successive sections describe transformations in courtship patterns, child-bearing, divorce, remarriage, cohabitation, housing, leisure activities, household and paid labor, maternal and paternal roles, childrearing practices, family rituals, and patterns of and policies toward abuse and neglect.
While HILDA contains detailed information on prior fertility and marriage histories, it contains very little information on cohabitation histories of respondents.
Oxford University Press (Cary, NC) has published "Common Law Marriage: A Legal Institution for Cohabitation," a 1250-page hardback book that examines the legal rules governing cohabitation and family law and policy.
Synopsis: Cohabitation is more common than marriage among 18- to 20-year-olds in the United States, but the two lifestyles are about even among 21- to 23-year-olds, and by age 24, marriage wins out.
Exceptions include Schoeni (1995), who finds no effect of cohabitation on earnings in Germany; Loh (1996), Stratton (2002), and Bardasi and Taylor (2004), who conclude that any effect of cohabitation is transitory; and Cohen (2002) and Richardson (2003), who find that cohabiting men receive a smaller premium than married men.
In this article, I explore some important limits to freedom imposed by family law and contribute to the recent debate about cohabitation and marriage.
Many Catholics believe living together before marriage is "living in sin" and associate premarital cohabitation with an increased divorce rate, but recent research reports a more detailed picture of the relationship between cohabitation and marital instability.