cohabit

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co·hab·it

 (kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. co·hab·it·ed, co·hab·it·ing, co·hab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

[Late Latin cohabitāre : Latin co-, co- + Latin habitāre, to dwell; see inhabit.]

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cohabit

(kəʊˈhæbɪt)
vb
(Sociology) (intr) to live together in a conjugal relationship, esp without being married
[C16: via Late Latin, from Latin co- together + habitāre to live]
ˌcohabiˈtee, coˈhabitant, coˈhabiter, coˈhabitor n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

co•hab•it

(koʊˈhæb ɪt)

v.i.
1. to live together as husband and wife, usu. without legal or religious sanction.
2. to live together in an intimate relationship.
3. to dwell with another or share the same place, as different species of animals.
[1520–30; < Late Latin cohabitāre <co- co- + habitāre to have possession, frequentative of habēre to have]
co•hab′it•ant, co•hab′it•er, n.
co•hab`i•ta′tion, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cohabit


Past participle: cohabited
Gerund: cohabiting

Imperative
cohabit
cohabit
Present
I cohabit
you cohabit
he/she/it cohabits
we cohabit
you cohabit
they cohabit
Preterite
I cohabited
you cohabited
he/she/it cohabited
we cohabited
you cohabited
they cohabited
Present Continuous
I am cohabiting
you are cohabiting
he/she/it is cohabiting
we are cohabiting
you are cohabiting
they are cohabiting
Present Perfect
I have cohabited
you have cohabited
he/she/it has cohabited
we have cohabited
you have cohabited
they have cohabited
Past Continuous
I was cohabiting
you were cohabiting
he/she/it was cohabiting
we were cohabiting
you were cohabiting
they were cohabiting
Past Perfect
I had cohabited
you had cohabited
he/she/it had cohabited
we had cohabited
you had cohabited
they had cohabited
Future
I will cohabit
you will cohabit
he/she/it will cohabit
we will cohabit
you will cohabit
they will cohabit
Future Perfect
I will have cohabited
you will have cohabited
he/she/it will have cohabited
we will have cohabited
you will have cohabited
they will have cohabited
Future Continuous
I will be cohabiting
you will be cohabiting
he/she/it will be cohabiting
we will be cohabiting
you will be cohabiting
they will be cohabiting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cohabiting
you have been cohabiting
he/she/it has been cohabiting
we have been cohabiting
you have been cohabiting
they have been cohabiting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cohabiting
you will have been cohabiting
he/she/it will have been cohabiting
we will have been cohabiting
you will have been cohabiting
they will have been cohabiting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cohabiting
you had been cohabiting
he/she/it had been cohabiting
we had been cohabiting
you had been cohabiting
they had been cohabiting
Conditional
I would cohabit
you would cohabit
he/she/it would cohabit
we would cohabit
you would cohabit
they would cohabit
Past Conditional
I would have cohabited
you would have cohabited
he/she/it would have cohabited
we would have cohabited
you would have cohabited
they would have cohabited
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.cohabit - share living quarters; usually said of people who are not married and live together as a couple
inhabit, live, populate, dwell - inhabit or live in; be an inhabitant of; "People lived in Africa millions of years ago"; "The people inhabited the islands that are now deserted"; "this kind of fish dwells near the bottom of the ocean"; "deer are populating the woods"
miscegenate - marry or cohabit with a person of another race
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cohabit

[kəʊˈhæbɪt] VIcohabitar (with sb con algn)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cohabit

[kəʊˈhæbɪt] vivivre en concubinage, vivre maritalement
to cohabit with sb → vivre en concubinage avec qn, vivre maritalement avec qn
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cohabit

vi (esp Jur) → in nichtehelicher or nicht ehelicher Lebensgemeinschaft leben, zusammenleben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cohabit

[kəʊˈhæbɪt] vi (frm) to cohabit (with sb)coabitare (con qn)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cohabit

vi. cohabitar, vivir en unión sin matrimonio legal.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
It is equally unnecessary to state to what a degree that whole cathedral was familiar to him, after so long and so intimate a cohabitation. That dwelling was peculiar to him.
No form or ceremony, civil or religious; no notice before, or publication after; no cohabitation, no writing, no witnesses even, are essential to the constitution of this, the most important contract which two persons can enter into.'--There is a Scotch judge's own statement of the law that he administers!
A classification of cohabitations which I consider especially useful in the perspective of an operationalization is that proposed by Tsai and that comprises as types:
Cohabitations in Romania or cohabitation as a problem
First, cohabitations are generally less homogamous than marriages.
The estimates are based on tables standardized to 20,000 couples per region, or 10,000 cohabitations and 10,000 marriages per region.
Cohabitations analogous to marriage are unions that approximate the
status, nonmarital cohabitations, in practice, fail to glean the many
As nonmarital cohabitation has skyrocketed over the last several decades, courts and legislatures have increasingly struggled to decide what legal effect an ex-spouse's cohabitation with a new partner should have on the receipt of alimony payments.
The trial court recognized that to construe cohabitation to include a prison inmate would be "absurd" and "unthinkably bizarre." (5) Instead, the trial court found that Patricia's alimony should be reduced because she had diminished financial need while incarcerated.
One of these rapid processes is the growth of non-traditional family forms, especially unmarried cohabitation. The increase of cohabitation is illustrated by the fact that the number of children born out of wedlock has risen (Bumpass and Sweet 1989, Kiernan 2000, Manning and Smock 1995, Paetsch, Bala, Bertrand and Glennon 2004, Perelli-Harris et al.
Although considerable research has been devoted to cohabitation, less attention has been paid to the formation process of cohabitation at the individual level.